Michel Roseau is a lawyer in Orrick's Paris office, in charge of the Competition law team. His broad practice covers particularly European law, State aid law, antitrust, litigation and merger control notifications (both as regulator and in private practice) and distribution law.

French and foreign companies and conglomerates rely on Michel to help them with strategic transactions or conflicting issues on the French energy, transportations, telecommunications, consumer goods and manufacturing markets, as well as regarding the European legislation. According to Chambers & Partners, clients praise Michel for being “very reliable from a technical point of view” and for his solution-oriented approach.

Michel has advised notably RATP and Vivendi on the merger control issues arising from their external growth operations and Astom’s board on the sale of its power units to General Electric. He also counseled French perfumes retailer Marionnaud Parfumeries before the French Competition Authority for the examination of the acquisition by Advent International of its competitor Nocibé.

Michel previously served several executive positions in the French administration, notably at the Ministry of European Affairs and Ministry of Economy and Finance. From 2002 to 2006, Michel Roseau was Director of the antitrust unit of the French Office of Fair Trading (Direction Générale de la Concurrence), where he coordinated numerous antitrust investigations, participated in drafting EU and French laws on competition issues and appeared before the Paris Court of Appeal many times as the Government Commissioner for antitrust litigation. Before joining Orrick, Michel was a partner at Bird & Bird.

Michel regularly publishes articles in the Competition Review (Revue Concurrences) journal. He also teaches “European litigation” in the “Business European Law” Masters program at the University Paris II – Panthéon-Assas.

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Posts by: Michel Roseau

Fine in Phosphates Cartel Case Confirms Need to Carefully Evaluate European Commission Settlement Proposals

Businessman's hands exchanging euro on blue background, closeup shot Fine in Phosphates Cartel Case Confirms Need to Carefully Evaluate European Commission Settlement Proposals

On January 12, 2017, the Court of Justice of the European Union (“CJEU”) dismissed Roullier group’s appeal and thereby confirmed a fine of €59,850,000 imposed by the European Commission (“EC”) in the phosphates cartel case.[1] This blog post summarizes the decision and discusses the CJEU’s reasoning, which provides valuable guidance to a firm in a cartel investigation that is evaluating a settlement proposal from the EC. In particular, the firm must weigh the fact that, pursuant to the CJEU’s decision, the EC may ultimately impose fines greater than those it proposed in a rejected settlement offer, even if it determines that the firm’s cartel participation was significantly less than it thought at the time of settlement discussions.

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Phone Roaming Charges for Periodic Travel in the European Union To End

The European Union commitments contained in the Telecoms Single Market Regulation of 2015 to end roaming charges for periodic travel in the EU requires the EC to adopt rules by December 15, 2016. Image of a man in the park checking roaming status on the smartphone screen.

The development of a digital single market is a key objective for the European Union. As Jean-Claude Juncker, President of the European Commission (“EC”) said in September, “We need to be connected. Our economy needs it.[1] Although this economic policy objective was initiated when the EC published its communication on the Digital Single Market Strategy[2] for Europe in 2015, the various proposals it contains need to be formally adopted and implemented in the EU. This process is now underway.

The EU’s commitments contained in the Telecoms Single Market Regulation[3] of 2015 to end roaming charges for periodic travel in the EU required the EC to adopt rules by 15 December 2016.  A transition period—starting from 30 April 2016 to 15 June 2017—has been established to make the abolition of roaming charges sustainable throughout the EU without an increase in domestic prices.  On December 8, the EC sent an implementing draft on the end of the roaming charges to the representatives of Member States (via the Communications Committee (“COCOM”)). They voted on the text on December 12, and the EC will adopt these new rules regarding the retail market[4] in the coming days. READ MORE

E-Commerce: The EU Commission Releases Its Preliminary Report in the E-Commerce Sector Inquiry

After gathering information from nearly 1800 stakeholders from all 28 EU Member States and collecting around 8000 distribution agreements, the EU Commission published on 15 September a preliminary report on the findings of its ongoing competition sector inquiry into e-commerce.[1]

The inquiry was launched by the Commission in May 2015, after finding that despite the growing significance for e-commerce across EU countries over the last years (approximately 50% of the population of the Union shopped online in 2014), cross-border online trade remained limited.

While such limitations may have been attributable to language barriers, consumer preferences or differences in legal frameworks between Member States, the Commission sought to investigate the sector based on indications that companies active on the e-commerce market may be engaged in anticompetitive agreements.

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Fnac-Darty: A Landmark Merger Decision in France

On 18 July 2016, the French Competition Authority (“FCA”) broke new ground in France by holding that retail distribution of electronic products through both physical stores and online channels is a single relevant market.

The background and the FCA’s Decision

The FCA’s decision concerns Fnac’s acquisition of Darty. The proposed transaction drew a great deal of public attention because it involves France’s two largest click and mortar retailers. It drew even more attention in March 2016, when the FCA announced a phase II examination of the potentially negative effects of the merger. However, in its 18 July 2016 decision, the FCA reversed course and granted conditional approval for the transaction after determining the relevant market includes both online and physical distribution channels.

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The European Commission’s Priorities in Pursuing Enforcement Actions

Businesses often wonder how competition authorities pick and choose the cases they decide to bring.  Companies with operations in Europe now have some guidance as a result of a recent speech by European Competition Commissioner Margrethe Vestager, in which she outlined how the Commission prioritizes its enforcement efforts.

Commissioner Vestager explained that the Commission uses three main criteria in prioritizing which cases to pursue.  Not every case needs to satisfy all three criteria, but the Commission tries to keep these three objectives in mind in determining whether to pursue an enforcement action.

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