Patricia Zeigler, Of Counsel in the Washington, D.C., office, focuses her practice on antitrust law with particular emphasis in Hart-Scott-Rodino Act compliance and counseling. Her experience includes advising clients on issues of reportability and interpretations of the Hart-Scott-Rodino Antitrust Improvements Act and its regulations.

Pat also has expertise in the applicability of foreign premerger requirements and filings with regulators in the European Union, Asia and Canada.

Pat served as antitrust counsel to two large industry groups establishing Business to Business exchanges for E-commerce transactions. She currently serves as general counsel to five large trade associations in a wide range of industries. In addition, Pat works with trade groups to set up and run joint purchasing organizations.

Prior to joining the firm, Pat practiced antitrust law for over a decade with Pillsbury Madison & Sutro.

In addition to being admitted in the District of Columbia, Pat is also admitted in California (inactive).

Array

Posts by: Patricia Zeigler

The FTC Expands the Scope of Documents Needed for an HSR Filing

As of November 28, 2016, the Federal Trade Commission expanded the filing obligations under teh Hart-Scott-Rodino (HSR) Act. Mergers and Acquisitisions Office folder on Desktop on table with Office Supplies and Ipad.

As of November 28, 2016, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has expanded the filing obligations under the Hart-Scott-Rodino (HSR) Act by requiring filers to submit certain documents analyzing a deal or affected markets even where the evaluation or analysis is limited to geographies or operations outside of the United States. This is a significant shift in the Agency’s interpretation of Items 4(c) and 4(d) of the HSR Notification and Report Form.

READ MORE

ValueAct Settlement Marks Record Penalty in Heightened Agency Efforts Against HSR Act Violations

company

Where is the line drawn between acquisitions of securities made “solely for the purpose of investment” on one hand, and influencing control, thereby requiring regulatory approval, on the other hand? That is the central cautionary question that was reinforced by the July 12, 2016, Department of Justice (“DOJ”) settlement with ValueAct Capital.  The well-known activist investment firm agreed to pay $11 million to settle a suit alleging that it violated the premerger reporting and waiting period requirements of the Hart-Scott-Rodino Antitrust Improvements Act of 1976 (“HSR Act”).  ValueAct purchased more than $2.5 billion of shares in two oil companies, Baker Hughes Inc. and Halliburton Co., after they announced they would merge.  The DOJ alleged that ValueAct used its ownership position to influence the proposed merger and other aspects of Baker Hughes and Halliburton, and thus could not rely on the exemption.

READ MORE

FTC Increases Maximum Civil Penalties for Violations of Competition Statutes

shutterstock_179476127_400x300

On June 30, 2016, the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) announced increases to the maximum civil penalties issuable for violations of several key competition statutes.  The agency made these changes to comply with the Federal Civil Penalties Inflation Adjustment Act Improvements Act of 2015, which required the agency adjust penalty amounts for laws it enforces based on a methodology provided for by Congress.

READ MORE

FTC Provides New Guidance on Classifying Foreign Entities Under the HSR Pre-Merger Notification Program

shutterstock_144792703_400x300

On May 19, 2016, the Federal Trade Commission (“FTC)” issued an important clarification regarding how the agency will determine whether a foreign entity is classified as corporate or non-corporate for the purpose of the agency’s premerger notification program.[1]  Under the Hart-Scott-Rodino Antitrust Improvements Act of 1976[2] (also referred to as the “HSR Act”), parties to certain mergers or acquisitions must notify both the Federal Trade Commission and the U.S. Department of Justice prior to consummating the transaction.  Under this program, whether a party to the transaction is a corporate or non-corporate entity (e.g., an LLC, partnership) can have significant implications for determining whether a filing is required and whether an exemption might apply.[3]  While evaluating party status has historically been straightforward for U.S. entities, foreign entities pose a number of challenges.

READ MORE