Mandy Perry, of counsel in the London office, is a member of the Employment Group. Mandy’s practice includes acting in high value litigation disputes in the High Court and Employment Tribunal where she has gained particular expertise in claims involving whistleblowing, discrimination and post termination restrictions.

Mandy specialises in all aspects of contentious and non-contentious employment law and advises clients across diverse sectors with particular emphasis on corporate and technology clients.

Mandy advises on the strategy and handling of redundancies, wrongful and unfair dismissals, TUPE, cross-border disputes, financial services remuneration issues, data protection and a full spectrum of employment-related legal issues.

Legal 500 describe Mandy as "a joy to work with, very experienced and knowledgeable". She is an accomplished speaker and regularly provides client training on legal updates, diversity matters and presents on all aspects of the employment relationship.

Some of Mandy's most notable recent engagements including the following:

  • Obtained various disclosure orders and a springboard injunction for a client against a former employee and a third party company, preventing them from dealing with each other or with the client’s products for 3 years.
  • Advised and represented a leading European bank, in relation to the defence and favourable tribunal outcome of an unfair dismissal and race, age and sex discrimination claim.
  • Advised a European bank in relation to employee aspects of an asset management merger including implementing a complete harmonisation of terms and conditions by way of dismissal and re-engagement.
  • Advised a leading global recycling and manufacturing company on a collective consultation exercise involving a large-scale redundancy, closure and voluntary benefits reduction exercise in two of its UK sites.
  • Advised a leading Scandinavian bank on a recent merger, relocation, harmonisation of terms and restructuring exercise.
  • Advised and represented a leading European bank, in relation to the defence and favourable settlement of an unfair dismissal, age and sex discrimination claim.
  • Advised and represented a leading financial institution in relation to grievance and disciplinary proceedings involving whistleblowing, personal injury and discrimination allegations and successfully avoiding any resulting claim.
  • Advised leading American investment bank in relation to a stress claim brought by an employee.
  • Defended an international software company against a multi-strand discrimination, unfair dismissal and whistleblowing claim by a vexatious litigant.
  • Defending a high profile fund management firm against a sex and race discrimination, sexual harassment, victimisation and bonus claim by an existing employee, achieving a swift and very favourable settlement.
  • Advised a multi-national money transfer business throughout an extremely complex expenses investigation and gross misconduct dismissal, together with detailed grievance and whistle-blowing investigations from two employees, successfully settling one (on very favourable terms) and achieving a complete dismissal of claims against the other after an appeal to the EAT.

Posts by: Mandy Perry

Brexit: What Does it Mean for Employers in the U.K.?


We set out below our best guess on where this leaves employees, management and HR in the UK.

Firstly as we have all heard repeatedly today, nothing is going to change immediately and that is the same for employment law.  It will be years before any changes are made and for the time being, everything remains the same and critically, no one has to leave.

Much of our employment law is just that – employment law driven solely by the UK.  We then have laws that have been enacted into UK law as a result of European directives – so those laws are the ones that may, at some point in the future, be targeted.  Our guess at Orrick is that changes where they happen will be focused on consultation rights, holiday pay and working time.  Worker involvement has never had the same traction in the UK that it has with our European counterparts and the UK has always viewed employee consultation with a degree of skepticism.  For this reason, we think it may eventually be a focus for change.


Cross-Border Trends: Mind the Gap


In the heady days of the Coalition Government, gender pay gap reporting started to get some traction on the political agenda. This led to the 2011 initiative ‘Think, Act, Report’ which encouraged employers to voluntarily publish gender pay gap information. According to a Guardian article in August 2014, citing a parliamentary question from the shadow Equalities Minster at the time, 200 companies signed up to the initiative but only four of those ever published any data. £90,000 of public money later and we were clearly no further on.


Cross-Border Trends: UK to Follow US Attack on the Gender Pay Gap


Following months of waiting the UK Government has finally published its draft regulations on the new “gender pay gap reporting” requirements in the UK. On publication of the draft regulations, the UK Government has asked one final consultation question: “What, if any, modifications should be made to these draft regulations?” – And so it would appear that the draft regulations are nearing but possibly not quite in final form, pending any pertinent responses received.


On My Whistle: Are You Up to Speed in the UK with the Financial Conduct Authority’s New Rules on whistleblowing?


Relevant firms in the UK have until March 7, 2016 to appoint a “whistleblowers’ champion,” who then has until September 7, 2016 to oversee their firm’s readiness for the new whistleblowing regime.

The new whistleblowing regime: why make the change?

Since the 2013 Parliamentary Commission on Banking Standards recommendations were published in the UK, the Financial Conduct Authority (“FCA”) has been examining ways to ensure that individuals working in financial services feel able and encouraged to speak up when they have concerns to avoid the same financial scandals of the past.


International data transfer news… a bit like buses

Global Finance

You know how you wait for ages for a bus to come (well, we do in Europe) and then three come along at once? Well it’s a little like that in the data privacy arena right now, as far as transfer of international personal data is concerned, anyhow. For years, there has been a reasonably steady and fairly consistent position from the various bodies responsible for this complicated and often confusing area of law, but in the last few weeks we have been hit with a significant change overnight and we are all left wondering where to get off.


Where to Draw the Line: HR’s Role in Disciplinary Decisions

Road Signs

In the recent case of Ramphal v. Department of Transport (DoT) the tricky question of where HR should draw the line in a disciplinary matter between guiding the decision-maker on the right decision, and making that decision for them, was considered. The results weren’t great for the HR manager involved in this case…


Say What You Will About Employment Law in the UK but It Is Never Boring


Imagine that you have a senior employee who you have decided (for whatever reason) that you do not want anymore but you do not want to pay out his 12-month notice period.  As an ingenious attempt to get around that, you instruct forensic investigators to carry out a ‘fishing expedition’ to try and find some dirt on him that will justify you summarily dismissing him, rather than paying out what he is owed under his contract.  Imagine that your luck is in and you do indeed find some dirt but that the dirt you find is five year old dirt.  Would you think that the High Court is going to accept this approach and agree that you don’t have to pay the notice period?


Holidays (Un)Limited


Richard Branson is now offering his staff unlimited holidays. Below we set out the key UK employment law considerations to bear in mind if you want to follow suit.

We’ve received a number of requests in the past 12 months to include an unlimited holiday clause in standard employment contracts. It’s a Silicon Valley trend edging its way into the UK employment landscape via tech companies. At first glance it appears to be an incredibly attractive benefit and the oft quoted reason for unlimited holidays is to offer a unique perk to lure in and retain the best talent.