European Banking Authority

European Commission Adopts Implementing Regulation on Its Own Supervisory Reporting to Reflect IFRS 9 Changes to FINREP

 

On July 5, 2017, the European Banking Authority (“EBA“) published a press release announcing that the European Commission (EC) adopted an Implementing Regulation on June 29, 2017, which amends the Implementing Regulation on supervisory reporting of institutions (Regulation 680/2014) under the Capital Requirements Regulation (Regulation 575/2013) (CRR). The text of the Implementing Regulation and its Annexes has been published by the Commission.

The changes relate to the provisions in Regulation 680/2014, which concern financial reporting (“FINREP“) and are intended to align these provisions with International Financial Reporting Standard 9 (IFRS 9). Regulation 680/2014 includes FINREP requirements that are founded on international accounting standards and must be updated in line with any updates made to the relevant accounting standards.

It is now time for the Implementing Regulation to be published in the Official Journal of the EU (OJ). It will apply from March 1, 2018.

EBA Final Guidelines on Disclosure Requirements for EU Banking Sector

On December 14, 2016, the European Banking Authority (“EBA“) published a final report (EBA/GL/2016/11) containing guidelines on regulatory disclosure requirements following its consultation in June 2016.

The guidelines follow an update of the Pillar 3 requirements by the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision (BCBS) and do not change the substance of the regulatory disclosures regarding the requirements defined in Part Eight of the Capital Requirements Regulation (Regulation 575/2013) (“CRR“).

They provide further guidance and support to institutions in complying with both the CRR and the Pillar 3 requirements. In particular, the guidelines cover the entire content of the Pillar 3 framework, with the exception of:

  • Securitization requirements, which are currently under discussion at the EU level following the finalization of a revised securitization framework at the international level.
  • Other disclosure requirements in Part Eight of the CRR for which there are already EBA delegated or implementing regulations or guidelines, such as own funds and leverage ratio.

The guidelines apply to globally and other systemically important institutions (“G-SIIs” and “O-SIIs“). Competent authorities may still require institutions that are neither G-SIIs nor O-SIIs to apply some or all the guidance provided for in the guidelines when complying with the requirements in Part Eight of the CRR.

The guidelines apply from December 31, 2017. However, an accompanying press release states that G‑SIIs are encouraged to comply with a subset of the guidelines as soon as December 31, 2016.

EBA Provides Final RTS and Guidelines on the Definition of Default under CRR

On September 28, 2016, the European Banking Authority (“EBA“) published final reports on the documents relating to the definition of default under Article 178 of the Capital Requirements Regulation (Regulation 575/2013) (“CRR“):

  • Guidelines on the application of the definition of default under Article 178 (EBA/GL/2016/07) – the guidelines clarify all aspects related to the application of the definition of default, which is used for the purpose of both the internal ratings based approach (IRB approach) and for the standardized approach. The guidelines apply from January 1, 2021, although the EBA is encouraging firms to implement relevant changes in their internal procedures and IT systems before that date.
  • Draft regulatory technical standards (RTS) on the materiality threshold for credit obligations past due under Article 178 (EBA/RTS/2016/06) – Article 178 specifies that a default shall be considered to have occurred when an obligor has past more than 90 days on any material credit obligation to the firm, the parent undertaking or any of its subsidiaries. The draft RTS, which were mandated by Article 178(6) of the CRR, specify the conditions according to which a competent authority should set the materiality threshold for credit obligations that are past due.

The EBA has also published a report setting out the results of a qualitative and quantitative impact study (“QIS“) that assessed the impact on the regulatory capital requirements of selected policy options to harmonize the definition of default. The EBA states that the results of the QIS are the basis for the impact assessment carried out on the guidelines and the draft RTS.

The EBA consulted on these draft RTS and guidelines in October 2014 and September 2015 respectively (see Legal updates, EBA consults on draft RTS on materiality threshold of credit obligation past due and EBA consults on draft guidelines on application of default definition under CRR). According to an EBA press release, they form part of the EBA’s broader regulatory review of the internal ratings based (IRB) approach announced in February 2016.

 

EBA Consults on Guidelines on Minimum Professional Indemnity Insurance under PSD2

 

On September 22, 2016, the European Banking Authority (EBA) published a consultation paper (EBA/CP/2016/12) on draft guidelines in relation to professional indemnity insurance (PII) and the criteria competent authorities should follow when stipulating the minimum monetary amount of the PII or comparable guarantees for undertakings that apply to provide payment initiation services or account information services under PSD2 (the Directive on payment services in the internal market ((EU) 2015/2366)). The EBA was mandated to produce the guidelines under Article 5(4) of PSD2. The consultation on the draft guidelines closes on November 30, 2016.

As well as setting out the proposed criteria, the EBA also:

  • Sets out with explanations its proposal to use a formula for the calculation of the minimum monetary amounts.
  • Provides details on indicators for the criteria set out in PSD2 along with the calculation method proposed for some of those indicators.
  • Provides circumstances in which the lowest tier, or default value, should be used.

The EBA also provided practical examples to assist in the calculation of the minimum amount of PII or comparable guarantee.

EBA Consults on Fee Terminology and Disclosure Documents under Payment Accounts Directive

 

Pursuant to the Payment Accounts Directive (2014/92/EU) (PAD), on September 22, 2016, the European Banking Authority (EBA) published a consultation paper on draft technical standards on fee terminology and disclosure documents under the directive.

The EBA will be holding a public hearing at its premises on 21 November 2016 and the consultation process closes on December 22, 2016.

Following the consultation the EBA set out the following three draft technical standards:

  • Draft regulatory technical standards (RTS) setting out the standardized terminology for services that are common to at least a majority of member states (required under Article 3(4) of the PAD).
  • Draft implementing technical standards (ITS) relating to the standardization of presentation format on the fee information document (FID) and its common symbol (required under Article 4(6) of the PAD).
  • Draft ITS relating to a standardized presentation format of the statement of fees (SoF) and its common symbol (required under Article 5(4) of the PAD).

The draft technical standards aim to standardize eight terms for services that are to be used by payment service providers (PSPs), as well as providing consumer-friendly definitions of these terms in all EU official languages. The EBA identified the terminology based on the national provisional lists that member states have developed in line with the EBA’s March 2015 guidelines on standardized fee terminology (see Legal update, EBA final report and guidelines on national provisional lists of the most representative services linked to a payment account and subject to a fee).

PSPs will have to use the proposed standardized terminology in the pre-contractual FID and the post-contractual SoF disclosure documents.

European Commission Adopts Implementing Regulation on ITS for Reporting Results of Internal Approach Calculations under Article 78(2) CRD IV Directive

 

On September 19, 2016, the European Commission adopted an Implementing Regulation implementing technical standards (ITS) for templates, definitions and IT solutions to be used by institutions when reporting the results of their internal approach calculations to the European Banking Authority (EBA) and to competent authorities under the CRD IV Directive (2013/36/EU).

The Implementing Regulation is based on the draft ITS submitted by the EBA to the Commission in March 2015 to which the EBA published an opinion agreeing to the Commission’s amendments to the ITS in May 2016. Once the Implementing Regulation has been published in the Official Journal of the EU (OJ) it will enter into force on the 20th day following its publication.

EBA Amends Implementing Technical Standards on Benchmarking of Internal Approaches under CRD IV

On August 4, 2016, the European Banking Authority (EBA) published and submitted to the EU Commission an amended version of its Implementing Technical Standards (ITS) on benchmarking of internal approaches under Article 78(8) of the CRD IV Directive (which can be found in a zip file on the EBA’s website).

The EBA has amended the ITS for the purposes of running the 2017 benchmarking exercise. The amended ITS will assist competent authorities in their 2017 assessment of internal approaches both for credit risk, and for market risk. In a related press release, the EBA explains that, given the type of changes introduced in the instructions and templates, the relevant annexes are replaced in whole so that there is a consolidated version of the updated ITS package.

The EBA plans to annually update the ITS and to maintain them on a regular basis to ensure the success and quality of future benchmarking exercises.

EBA Publishes Report on Leverage Ratio Requirements under Article 511 of the CRR

On August 3, 2016, the European Banking Authority (EBA) published a report on the leverage ratio (LR) requirements under the Capital Requirements Regulation (CRR).

The EBA report recommends the introduction of a minimum LR requirement in the EU to mitigate the risk of excessive leverage, which is in line with the discussions held by the Group of Central Bank Governors and Heads of Supervision (GHOS) – the governing body of the Basel Committee on Banking Supervision (BCBS) – in January 2016.

The analysis suggests that the potential impact of introducing a LR requirement of 3 percent on the provision of financing by credit institutions would be relatively moderate, while, overall, it should lead to more stable credit institutions. Similarly, on the basis of econometric analysis, it has been estimated that risk taking should not be strongly affected. The EBA considers that the introduction of a 3 percent LR should lead to more stable credit institutions overall and the combined application of a risk-based ratio and a LR requirement will reduce the overall cyclicality of capital requirements.

The EBA also assessed the exposure of different categories of credit institutions to the risk of excessive leverage (REL) concluding that the results do not give a strong indication of differences in the degree of exposure to REL across different types of credit institutions. However, global systemically important institutions (GSIIs) show a higher exposure to REL and therefore a higher LR requirement may be warranted.

The report also flags that while the Basel LR standard fits well with the EU banking sector, the same cannot be said for all business models covered by other EU prudential regulations. For example, the EBA recommends that central counterparties (CCPs) and central securities depositaries (CSDs) be exempted. The report describes the characteristics of various specialized business models, such as public development banks, concluding that there is little room for differentiating the LR without opening the door to cases of circumvention of the basic principles of the LR. The report did not find evidence to exempt certain credit institutions from being subject to compliance with the LR minimum requirement of 3 percent on the basis of their limited size. However, the EBA will explore in more detail a reduced frequency and granularity of reporting requirements in the case of smaller credit institutions in future updates of the implementing technical standards (ITS) on LR reporting.

The Commission is required to submit a report on the impact and effectiveness of the LR, and potential legislative proposals, to the European Parliament and the Council of the EU by December 31, 2016.

EBA Publishes Interim Report on MREL

The European Banking Authority (EBA) has published an interim report on the minimum requirement for own funds and eligible liabilities (MREL). Under the Bank Recovery and Resolution Directive (2014/59/EU) (BRRD) the EBA is required to submit a report to the European Commission on the implementation of MREL by October 31, 2016.  This report will assist the Commission in its work on a legislative proposal on the harmonized application of MREL as well as a legislative proposal to review MREL and implement the total loss absorbing capacity standard in the EU.

The EBA’s interim report is intended to provide input into the Commission’s deliberations ahead of the preparations of the EBA’s final report and contains a number of provisional recommendations. Preliminary quantitative findings on the financing capacity and needs of EU banking groups are also available in the interim report, although these are subject to several methodological caveats.  In the absence of MREL decisions for institutions to date, and given the limited information related to the resolution authorities’ MREL policy approach, the EBA was required to make assumptions on the likely scope and calibration of MREL.  These assumptions are by definition different from the actual levels of MREL which will ultimately be determined by resolution authorities in relation to each institution and group.

The interim report is available here.

2015 Annual Reports

The following bodies have released their 2015 annual reports in the past week:

  • EIOPA (European Insurance and Occupational Pensions Authority)
  • ESMA (European Securities and Markets Authority)
  • EBA (European Banking Authority)

Each report contains a review of achievements from 2015 as well as looking forward to the objectives and challenges which will be relevant in the coming year.