‘Round and ‘Round the Tort Liability Goes – When It Stops, Whither the Insurance Chose?

Generally, the law allows “choses in action” to be alienated (sold). This is a change that has been adopted over the course of the last 100 years or more. See W.W. Cook, The Alienability of Choses in Action, 29 Harv. L. Rev. 816 (1916). Because claims under insurance contracts properly viewed are choses in action, (Black’s Law Dictionary (5th ed. 1979) at 219), most courts have allowed insurance claims to be sold, too, even when the transaction takes the form of an “assignment.”

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Caveat Advocat: Defense Lawyers as Coverage Lawyers

While insurance-coverage law has developed over the last 20 years into a rarefied specialty practice, lawyers who handle the defense of liability cases cannot punt on considering coverage issues – or they risk malpractice claims by their disgruntled clients. The New York Appellate Division recently confirmed that defense counsel may be exposed for failing to investigate the possibility of coverage – even where defense counsel has been retained by another insurance company for the benefit of the insured defendant.

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