Robert Uriarte is a member of Orrick’s Intellectual Property Business Unit located in Silicon Valley. Robert's practice focuses on copyright, trade secrets, and digital crimes.

Robert is a member of Orrick’s Cybersecurity and Data Privacy working group and also regularly works with Orrick’s Supreme Court and Appellate Practice Group on intellectual property issues.

In addition to litigation work, Robert also counsels companies ranging from market leaders to start-ups on intellectual property, security, and Internet law issues. 

Robert is committed to improving diversity in the legal profession. He co-chairs Orrick's Silicon Valley Diversity Committee and is one of the firm-wide facilitators for Orrick’s Latino Affinity Group. Robert is also committed to pro bono work and received the Legal Aid Association of California's 2015 Family Law Pro Bono Award.

Robert served as a law clerk to U.S. District Judge Oliver W. Wanger in the Eastern District of California prior to commencing private practice.

Robert's recent notable engagements include:

  • Oracle America, Inc. v. Google, Inc.--  Prosecution of copyright infringement suit regarding unauthorized copying of Java APIs in Android operating system.
  • In re: TOA Technologies, 543 Fed. Appx. 1006 (Fed. Cir. 2013)—  Defense of patent litigation concerning scheduling software
  • Micro Motion, Inc. v. Invensys Systems, Inc.—Petition for certiorari to U.S. Supreme Court concerning patent venue issues
  • Lam Research Corp. v. Jeff Belfor et al (Santa Clara County Superior Court)—Successful defense of trade secrets litigation related to rapid prototyping of semiconductor manufacturing components.
  • Microsoft v. John Does 1-8 Controlling a Computer Botnet (W.D. Texas 2013)—Obtained a TRO enjoining counterfeiting and violations of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act and Electronic Privacy Communications Act
  • Facebook Inc. v. Power Ventures, 2013 U.S. Dist. Lexis 137890 (N.D. Cal. 2013)—Obtained an injunction enjoining violations of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act, CAN-SPAM Act, and California Penal Code section 502.
  • Rosolowski et al. v. Zoosk, Inc. (San Francisco Superior Court Case No. CGC-13-528707)—Successful defense of putative class action alleging violations of California’s anti-spam statute.
  • Hard2Find Accessories v. Amazon.com, Inc. and Apple, Inc. (W.D. Wash. 2014)—Successful defense of Apple against various claims arising from Apple’s anti-counterfeiting enforcement efforts.

Posts by: Robert L. Uriarte

Above the Clouds: Jeweler’s Trade Secret Spat Highlights Risk of Employee-Controlled Cloud Storage

Rendering of a Cloud computing, Cloud Computing Concept Above the Clouds: Jeweler’s Trade Secret Spat Highlights Risk of Employee-Controlled Cloud Storage

We have discussed before the importance of maintaining internal policies and procedures to protect the security and integrity of cloud-based repositories. A recent case in the U.S. District Court for the District of Maryland illustrates that this continues to be an important issue—particularly for companies who store their crown jewels on the cloud.

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PUT YOUR DOCS WHERE I CAN SEE THEM: Seattle Police Enjoined From Disclosing Software Secrets in Public Records Act Dispute

What happens when trade secret protections collide with laws granting public access to government records? This question took center stage in a recent case involving the Seattle Police Department (“SPD”). A federal district court enjoined the SPD from disclosing a software vendor’s allegedly trade secret information in response to a reporter’s public records act request.  Besides serving as a reminder of the precautions that companies should take when disclosing intellectual property to public agencies, the case also raises interesting questions and strategic considerations. READ MORE

Money Is Time: A Note on Valuation and Sentencing in Criminal Trade Secrets Cases

Criminal trade secrets prosecutions tend to make national headlines, and for good reason. With fact patterns that often involve international intrigue, high technology, and millions of dollars in play, these cases can read like a James Bond flick. But while astronomical monetary figures make good copy, they also present vexing legal questions that can have drastic impacts on sentencing. READ MORE

All Bets Are Off: Kentucky Downs Trade Secrets Case Presents Novel Question Under Kentucky’s Uniform Trade Secrets Act

Earlier this month, AmTote International, Inc. sued the famed Kentucky Downs racetrack, three high-ranking Kentucky Downs employees, and Encore Gaming, LLC in federal court alleging misappropriation of trade secrets related to horse racing betting machines.  AmTote’s lawsuit presents the interesting question of whether the “inevitable disclosure” doctrine applies under Kentucky law. READ MORE

Bigger in Texas? High Court to Decide Scope of Protection for Third Party Trade Secrets in Civil Discovery

On August 22, 2014, the Texas Supreme Court ordered oral argument in In re: Magnum Hunter Resources Corp., a case concerning the discoverability of third-party trade secrets documents in civil cases. When should such documents be produced? And who gets to see them?

A simple summary of the facts of Magnum Hunter are as follows:

Party A hires Law Firm to help it negotiate a contract with Party B regarding an oil and natural gas venture. Party A and Party B ultimately reach an agreement on the venture and enter into a contract that says that Party B will provide to Party A all reports related to the venture upon request, provided that Party A agrees to treat such reports as confidential information.

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Trade Secrets Watch 2013 Year-in-Review

It’s been a hot year in the trade secrets field, with some huge verdicts and settlements, a renewed spotlight on cyberattacks, and an unusual flurry of trade secrets legislation.  Trade Secrets Watch’s 2013 Year-in-Review highlights the notable trade secrets activity from the past year. READ MORE