safe harbor

New Cybersecurity Reporting Requirements? FinCEN Advisory Identifies Cybersecurity Events for Financial Institutions to Report

FinCEN Advisory Identifies Cybersecurity Events for Financial Institutions to Report Financial Building Facade

Last week, FinCEN (Financial Crimes Enforcement Network) issued a formal Advisory to Financial Institutions and published FAQs outlining specific cybersecurity events that should be reported through Suspicious Activity Reports (SARs).  This Advisory follows former FinCEN Director Jennifer Shasky Calvery’s recent statements reminding “financial institutions to include cyber-derived information (such as IP addresses or bitcoin wallet addresses) in suspicious activity reports.”  It also follows the launch of the Federal Financial Institutions Examination Council (FFIEC) Cybersecurity Assessment Tool (CAT).  Although the Advisory does not change existing Bank Secrecy Act (BSA) requirements or other regulatory obligations, the Advisory highlights a series of cybersecurity events–such as Distributed Denial of Service (DDoS) attacks and ransomware incidents–that should be reported on SARs filed with FinCEN, even though they often (but not always) fall outside the traditional notion of a data breach or a compromise of personal information.

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EU-U.S. Privacy Shield: Companies Can Now Certify

Privacy Shield

As of, August 1st, 2016, U.S. companies can now join the Safe Harbor successor EU-U.S. Privacy Shield (the “Privacy Shield”) for personal data transfers from the EU to the U.S.

This post gives a high level summary of what companies should consider with the Privacy Shield.

Background:

On July 12, 2016, the European Commission (the “Commission”) formally adopted the adequacy decision necessary to implement the Privacy Shield. This means that transfers of personal data from the EU to the U.S. that are made pursuant to the Privacy Shield’s requirements are lawful under EU law.  The Privacy Shield replaces the EU-U.S. Safe Harbor Framework, which was invalidated by the Court of Justice of the European Union (“CJEU”) on October 6, 2015.

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EU-U.S. Privacy Shield launched by European Commission

EU-US Privacy Shield

After receiving the approval of the EU Member States, through the Article 31 Committee, last Friday, the European Commission has today, July 12th, 2016, formally adopted the Adequacy Decision necessary to implement the EU-U.S. Privacy Shield (the Decision).

The Decision will be notified to Member States today and, as such, will be effective immediately.

The adoption process had stalled in recent months due to ongoing concerns about the access to personal data by public authorities in the U.S.  You can read about some of these concerns in our previous blog post.

The European Commission has received further commitments from the U.S. and has agreed clarifications and improvements on the bulk collection of data, strengthening the Ombudsperson mechanism and more explicit obligations on companies as regards limits on retention and onward transfers.  Those commitments and clarifications have been sufficient to allay the EU member states, at least for now.

The Privacy Shield is subject to an annual review mechanism.

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Data transfers in limbo – U.S. companies face fines by German data protection authorities

international data transfers

While EU regulators determine whether to adopt a new agreement for transfers of personal data from Europe to the United States to replace the invalid EU-U.S. Safe Harbor Framework, German data protection authorities have not been idly twiddling their thumbs.

Hamburg’s data protection commissioner, the head of one of 16 Federal German data protection authorities (“DPA”), announced in February that his agency is investigating Hamburg-based subsidiaries of large U.S. companies engaging in transfers of personal data of EU citizens to the U.S.

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EU-US Privacy Shield may not be up after all

data privacy

Bad news for companies relying on transatlantic data flows as, once again, the transfer of personal data from Europe to the United States is called into question by the Article 29 Working Party (the “Working Party”), an influential committee of the EU privacy regulators. Ever since the EU-U.S. Safe Harbor Framework was declared invalid by the Court of Justice of the European Union in October 2015, companies have had to find alternative ways to legally transfer personal data. On 29 February 2016, the EU Commission proposed the “EU-U.S. Privacy Shield” as a replacement to the Safe Harbor Framework and a potential solution.

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Tennessee Amends Breach Notice Statute and Sets Notice Deadline

data encryption

Tennessee recently amended its data breach notification law, and in doing so, it has joined the ranks of states like Florida, Ohio, and Wisconsin that require notification to residents of a data breach within a defined time period. When the law becomes effective on July 1, 2016, the statute will require notice to Tennessee residents within forty-five (45) days after discovery that personal information has been acquired by an “unauthorized person.” The original amendment required notice within fourteen (14) days, but the bill was subsequently amended  to expand the deadline to 45 days.

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EU-U.S. Privacy Shield is Go…nearly

Privacy Shield

On 29 February 2016 the European Commission issued the legal texts of the EU-U.S Privacy Shield which aims to replace the defunct EU-U.S Safe Harbor Framework as a legitimate mechanism for transferring personal data from the EU to the U.S.

In contrast to its predecessor, the Privacy Shield contains commitments from US government in relation to controls on access to personal data by public authorities. This is an aspect of the new scheme which aims to address the jurisprudence of the Court of Justice of the European Union and criticisms of the previous Safe Harbor Framework.

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FTC Enforcement in Schein: Misleading Statements about Encryption and Cybersecurity

encryption

On January 5, 2015, the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) entered into a consent order with dental software manufacturer Henry Schein Practice Solutions, Inc. (“Schein”) in connection with allegations that Schein had made misleading security-related representations about its software.  The consent order underscores that while security-enhanced product features are in high demand, companies must be careful to avoid unfair or deceptive marketing of such features.

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Does the Schrems Decision Open the Door to New Cyber Insurance Exclusions?

The shockwaves continue from the October 6, 2015 ruling of the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU), the European Union’s highest court, invalidating the U.S.-EU “Safe Harbor” data transfer regime in a controversy arising out of Maximillian Schrems’ complaint to the Irish Data Protection Commissioner. The Schrems decision obviously has huge privacy implications for companies that transferred data under the Safe Harbor regime, but it may also impact such companies’ cyber insurance.

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German DPAs Add Further Pressure to EU-US Data Transfers

International Privacy Law

Yesterday, German federal and state (Länder) data protection authorities (“DPAs”) issued a Position Paper following the recent Court of Justice of the European Union (“CJEU”) ruling that struck down the EU-US Safe Harbor Framework. Read an unofficial translation of the German Position Paper here.

Unfortunately, the Position Paper does little to relieve the pressure many organisations are now facing in relation to their cross-Atlantic data transfer mechanisms, particularly those used to transfer data from Germany to the United States.[1] READ MORE