Alexandra Stathopoulos

Senior Associate

San Francisco


Read full biography at www.orrick.com
Alex Stathopoulos, a senior associate in the San Francisco employment group, defends employers in complex wage and hour class actions and single plaintiff cases, and provides creative and practical counseling on a wide range of employment issues including new and developing areas of the law.

In 2018, Alex was named California Young Lawyers Association (CYLA) Section Liaison to the California Lawyers Association (CLA) Labor and Employment Section, and is an editorial board member of the CLA Labor & Employment Section Law Review.  She was also recently appointed as an Alternate Delegate to the American Bar Association (ABA) House of Delegates, the policymaking body of the nationwide group.

Alex defends employers in class and collective actions brought under federal and state wage and hour laws, including misclassification, meal and rest periods, off-the-clock work, expense reimbursement, and Private Attorney General Act (PAGA) claims.  She also routinely defends employers in high-stakes single plaintiff cases involving leaves and accommodations, discrimination, harassment, retaliation, whistleblowing, wrongful termination, and trade secrets.

Her counseling practice focuses on providing advice to management, designing appropriate workplace policies and procedures, and offering creative and practical solutions to address a wide range of employment issues including new and developing areas of the law.

Orrick’s Employment Law and Litigation group was recently named Labor & Employment Department of the Year in California for the fourth consecutive year by The Recorder, the premier source for legal news, in recognition of their significant wins on behalf of leading multinational companies on today’s most complex and challenging employment law matters.

Posts by: Alexandra Stathopoulos

Splitting the Baby: SCOTUS Ruling in Pregnancy Discrimination Suit Calls For Review of Pregnancy Accommodations

On March 25, 2015, the U.S. Supreme Court issued a decision in Young v. United Parcel Service, Inc., holding that the Pregnancy Discrimination Act (PDA) requires courts to consider the extent to which an employer’s policy treats pregnant workers less favorably than it treats non-pregnant workers similar in their ability or inability to perform their job duties.

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U.S. Census Bureau Down for the Count after Certification Ruling in Criminal Background Check Case

Gavel and Hundred-Dollar Bill

Last Tuesday, a Magistrate Judge in the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York granted partial class certification in a case where plaintiffs allege that the United States Census Bureau used arrest records to screen out job applicants, thereby transferring  disparities in arrest and conviction rates for African-Americans and Latinos into the agency’s hiring practices and setting up hurdles to employment that disproportionately affected these groups in violation of Title VII. READ MORE

Ending in a Draw: In Iskanian v. CLS Transportation, the California Supreme Court Upholds Class Action Waivers in Arbitration Agreements, But Also Makes PAGA Claims Unwaivable

Ever since the U.S. Supreme Court issued its decision in AT&T Mobility LLC v. Concepcion, California employers hoped this day would come. In a predictable result, the California Supreme Court today acknowledged that class action waivers in employment arbitration agreements are enforceable under the Federal Arbitration Act (FAA). In so doing, the Court overruled its 2007 decision in Gentry v. Superior Court which effectively had barred class action waivers for wage and hour cases. But the Court’s 6-1 plurality decision also bolstered an alternate method for bringing Labor Code claims in court by declaring that actions brought under the Private Attorneys General Act (Labor Code § 2968 et seq.) are not waivable by private agreement and thus not subject to compelled arbitration. READ MORE

Party Foul! NLRB Orders Reinstatement and Back Pay for Party Bus Guide After Finding Facebook Postings Amount to Protected Union Organizing Activity

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Providing yet another example of how online social networking can amount to protected conduct under the National Labor Relations Act, the NLRB ruled earlier this month in New York Party Shuttle, LLC and Fred Pflantzer, CN: 02-CA-073340 that a New York City tour guide’s Facebook postings constituted protected union organizing activities. The board held that New York Party Shuttle LLC unlawfully discharged Fred Pflantzer when it refused to give him new assignments after he posted Facebook messages criticizing the company’s employment practices. READ MORE

Department of Labor Clarifies When an Employee May Take FMLA Leave to Care for Adult Children

The ADA Amendments Act (“ADAAA”) expanded more than just employer liability for disability claims; it also broadened the scope of FMLA leave that employees may take to care for their adult children. On January 14, 2013, the Department of Labor clarified that the age of the onset of a disability is irrelevant to determining whether an individual is considered a “son or daughter” under the FMLA. See Dept. of Labor Wage and Hour Div., Administrator’s Interpretation No. 2013-1. READ MORE