Hannah M. Ghaffari

Managing Associate

Silicon Valley


Read full biography at www.orrick.com
Employment lawyer Hannah Ghaffari takes each case’s legal, business and interpersonal elements into account. By approaching her case through the emotional and professional lens of all parties involved, she’s able to offer a more successful path to resolution.

Her cases involve a wide range of employment issues, such as wage and hour, pay equity, and discrimination disputes. Hannah also offers targeted counseling to help employers avoid and mitigate risk throughout the year.

In addition to employment, she has handled various business disputes, including breach of contract disputes on behalf of Microsoft, a defamation case, and a high-profile right of publicity case. She also represented Oracle in Oracle v. Google, a multi-billion dollar copyright trial.

Hannah is also active in Orrick’s pro bono program, having represented individuals seeking asylum in the United States and an individual seeking enforcement of a family support order in New York Family Court. She currently represents a family that was separated at the U.S. border.

Posts by: Hannah M. Ghaffari

Regulators Offer Insights Into SEC, CFTC, and OSHA Whistleblower Program’s Trends and Priorities

On July 16, 2019, three prominent whistleblower law regulators spoke at PLI’s Corporate Whistleblowing in 2019, which was co-chaired by Orrick partners Mike Delikat and Renee Phillips. With the standard disclaimer that their comments and opinions were their own and not the official comments of their respective agencies, each spoke about their agencies’ whistleblower program’s current progress, challenges, and priorities. READ MORE

What We May See from the California Supreme Court in 2019

2018 saw some major developments in employment law, particularly in California. The California Supreme Court embraced the ABC test for independent contractors in Dynamex, and rejected the de minimis doctrine for Labor Code claims in Troester. While 2019 has already brought legislative changes through the #metoo laws effective January 1, attention should also be on cases before the California Supreme Court. These cases may present new challenges for all employers, but particularly for media companies and employers doing business across state lines. The Court’s decisions in these cases have the potential to increase employers’ exposure to liability. We highlight some such cases here. READ MORE