Alexandra Guerra

Associate

Sacramento


Read full biography at www.orrick.com

Alex Guerra, an Associate in the Sacramento Office, is a member of the Employment Law & Litigation Group.

Alex focuses her practice on employment litigation and counseling.  Alex defends employers in class action, multi-plaintiff, and single plaintiff lawsuits on a variety of issues, including discrimination, harassment, wrongful termination, misclassification, and wage-and-hour claims.  Orrick's Employment Law & Litigation group was recently named Labor & Employment Department of the Year in California by The Recorder in recognition of their significant wins on behalf of leading multinational companies on today's most complex and challenging employment law matters.

Before joining Orrick, Alex was active in California politics.  She helped manage presidential, congressional, and supervisorial campaigns and held leadership positions within the youth arm of a major political party.  Alex also interned for high-ranking members of the legislature, to include the Majority Whip of the California State Assembly and the President pro Tempore of the California State Senate.  These experiences put Alex in a position to understand the complexity of California’s employment laws and the varied interests motivating these policies.

Posts by: Alex Guerra

Legislative Update: Illinois is the Latest State to Join Nationwide Trend of Salary History Ban Laws

Orrick’s Equal Pay Pulse has been tracking the nationwide wave of salary history bans in recent years.  A growing number of states and territories now have laws restricting the use of salary history information, including Alabama, California, Colorado, Connecticut, Delaware, Hawaii, Maine, Massachusetts, New Jersey, New York, North Carolina, Oregon, Puerto Rico, Vermont, and Washington.  Illinois became the latest state to catch this wave with a recent amendment to the Illinois Equal Pay Act of 2003. READ MORE

Mind the Gap: Ireland Takes Steps Towards Mandatory Pay Data Reporting

The Irish government is making pay equity a priority and is looking to join the trend of other countries across the world requiring employers’ regular reporting of wages. The lower house of the Irish legislature recently published a bill that, if passed this year, would require certain employers in Ireland to report gender pay data as soon as 2020. READ MORE

Pay Equity Compliance in the Law Down Under

While many states across the U.S. continue to develop new equal pay laws, it is also important for global companies to be aware of equal pay laws abroad. Countries far and wide including the United Kingdom, Germany, Canada, Belgium, Iceland and South Africa have instituted various forms of laws addressing pay equity issue. While these laws have varying requirements, we look at Australia as an example of the global picture. READ MORE

Business Groups Urge U.S. Supreme Court to Review Ninth Circuit Decision Rejecting Use of Prior Salary to Set Pay

In the wake of the Ninth Circuit’s decision in Rizo v. Yovino, key employer-side groups have expressed support for U.S. Supreme Court review to determine whether employers who rely on prior salary to set starting pay can continue to do so consistent with the federal Equal Pay Act, 29 U.S.C. § 206(d)(1) (“EPA”). READ MORE

Is it Safe to Wade into the “Safe Harbor” Waters in Recent Pay Laws?

A growing number of state and local governments have passed equal pay laws in recent years. These statutes and ordinances have varied in their specific content and have created a patchwork of legal requirements vexing employers who are attempting to comply. Two states have added wrinkles to this patchwork. While many of the obligations have favored employees, Massachusetts and Oregon have attempted to tip the scales to employers by creating “safe harbor” provisions aimed at providing some form of relief for employers who perform voluntary pay audits and correct any adverse findings through “safe harbor” provisions. These provisions, however, raise significant questions that employers must consider before concluding that they are fully protected. READ MORE