Steven Fink

Partner

New York


Read full biography at www.orrick.com
Steve Fink, a partner in the New York office, practices in the areas of commercial and securities litigation.

Steve has handled a wide range of investment-related disputes, including RMBS disclosure and put-back litigation, structured finance waterfall disputes, disputes between private equity fund managers and their limited partners, auditor liability matters, and disputes concerning financing arrangements for life settlements and alternative energy projects.  He has also been heavily involved in litigation concerning the termination and valuation of derivatives transactions, including credit default swaps, interest rate swaps and reserve fund agreements, among others.

Posts by: Steven J. Fink

U.S. Bank Reaches $6 Million Settlement of Claims for Breach of RMBS Trustee Duties

On December 17, the parties in Oklahoma Police Pension and Retirement System v. U.S. Bank, N.A., No. 11-cv-8066 (S.D.N.Y.) asked the court to approve a $6 million settlement of class action claims asserted against U.S. Bank in its capacity as trustee for five RMBS trusts sponsored by Bear Stearns. The class consisted of 1,800 investors who had bought certificates in the trusts. Claims related to nine other trusts had been dismissed earlier in the litigation and were not included in the settlement. The complaint included claims for breach of contract, breach of the covenant of good faith and fair dealing, and violation of the federal Trust Indenture Act.  Motion for ApprovalSettlement Agreement.

Second Circuit Affirms Dismissal of $56M MBS Suit against Bank of America

On November 25, the United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit upheld the dismissal of IKB Deutsche Industriebank AG’s suit against Bank of America. IKB alleged that BofA fraudulently misrepresented the quality of loans underlying mortgage backed securities sold in 2005 and 2006. The court held that the complaint’s generalized allegations that BofA knew of claimed mortgage defects by virtue of access to due diligence reports prepared by Clayton and BofA’s own due diligence procedures were not sufficient to plead fraudulent intent. The court also affirmed dismissal of IKB’s claim for fraud relating to representations about the transfer of mortgages to the issuing trust, holding that these representations constituted promises to perform in the future and thus were not the proper subject of a fraud claim absent allegations that there was an intent not to perform at the time the promises were made.  Summary Order.