Abigail W. Lloyd

Senior Associate

Orange County


Read full biography at www.orrick.com

Abby Lloyd is a Senior Associate in the Litigation Department of Orrick’s Orange County office. She is an experienced trial lawyer, having successfully tried, as both first and second chair, numerous cases in her career. As former in-house counsel for a large, international technology company, she also has extensive experience drafting, reviewing and negotiating complex commercial agreements including supply agreements, IP licenses and services contracts.

Abby has represented some of the nation’s leading high technology companies in a variety of litigation disputes involving, among other things, theft of trade secrets, unfair competition, intellectual property, patent infringement, joint-venture financings, and shareholder class action and derivative suits. Her practice includes both state and federal jurisdictions, and involves all stages of the litigation process.

Abby previously served as a “generalist” in house counsel for a major, international technology company, where she advised on litigation matters, data security solutions, employment, wage & hour, and sexual harassment disputes, as well as negotiated over one hundred contracts, including outsourcing, intellectual property, hardware as a service (HaaS) contracts and software licenses. As in house counsel, Abby coordinated feedback and worked collaboratively with other business functions (Tax, HR, Finance, etc.) to achieve favorable business outcomes.  

Abby is also an alumnus of the Orange County Trial Attorney Participation Program, where she served as a full-time Deputy District Attorney, first-chairing criminal jury trials and prosecuting felony preliminary hearings. She is also a founding member of the Orange County Lavender Bar Association.

Posts by: Abigail W. Lloyd

Are State Governments Immune From Suit For Misappropriation Of Trade Secrets?

You are a state-government contractor. You respond to an RFP issued by a state-government entity. In your bid proposal, you submit documents that contain your trade secrets. You do not get the contract, but you later learn that the state-government entity gave your trade secret information to your direct competitor who did get the contract. Do you have any options under federal or state trade secret laws to sue the state? READ MORE

Spring Cleaning: Tidying Up Your “Reasonable Efforts” to Maintain Trade Secrets

It’s among an in-house counsel’s worst nightmares. A former business partner, ex-employee, consultant, or competitor has stolen your company’s trade secret information. Company management demands swift action. You hire outside counsel who, after reviewing your company policies and interviewing stakeholders, tells you that he or she is concerned about being able to establish that your company took “reasonable efforts” to protect the information. Listening to the feedback, you realize with a sinking feeling that these were steps that you, as in-house counsel, may have been able to implement if you had only thought about the issue sooner. READ MORE