Krystal Anderson

Associate

Orange County


Read full biography at www.orrick.com
Krystal Anderson, a lawyer in Orrick's Orange County office, focuses her practice on complex business litigation and dispute resolution.

During law school, Krystal completed an externship for Honorable Judge Alex Kozinski at the United States Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit, served as President of the Cornell Law Students Association, was the Senior Cornell Law Library Research Assistant, and received academic awards including the CALI Award in Remedies.

Posts by: Krystal Anderson

Using Non-Compete Agreements in Employment Contracts to Protect Trade Secrets

Employers in many industries use non-compete agreements as a key tool to protect trade secrets.  According to U.S. Treasury reports, non-compete agreements impact approximately 30 million – nearly one in five – U.S. workers, including roughly one in six workers without a college degree.

Some employers have imposed non-compete agreements across a broad segment of their workforce, including imposing them on low-wage earning employees and employees who are not privy to trade secrets or other confidential information.  Non-compete agreement opponents argue that such broad non-compete agreements can interfere with the employee’s right to make a living without any off-setting benefit for the employer.  In the past few years, state attorneys general have been successfully suing companies to invalidate what many see as overly-expansive non-compete agreements.

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Rising Tensions as Trump Administration Prepares to Announce Results of Section 301 Trade Investigation into China’s Alleged Intellectual Property Rights Violations

As we previously reported, on August 14, 2017, President Trump signed an executive memo asking U.S. Trade Representative Robert Lighthizer to determine whether to launch an investigation into China’s alleged theft of intellectual property under Section 301 of the Trade Act of 1974. Later that week, after a review of Chinese laws, policies, and practices relating to IP, Lighthizer recommended and launched an investigation “to determine whether acts, policies, and practices of the Government of China related to technology transfer, intellectual property, and innovation are unreasonable or discriminatory and burden or restrict U.S. commerce.” READ MORE