Insurance Coverage Dispute Over Fraudulent E-mail Scam Heard by Ninth Circuit

Data Privacy Word Cloud Insurance Coverage Dispute Over Fraudulent E-mail Scam Heard by Ninth Circuit

Insurers’ recalcitrance to providing coverage for the “Business E-mail Compromise” (BEC) scam is a topic we’ve frequently discussed. On Monday, the Ninth Circuit heard oral argument in a BEC coverage action, Taylor & Lieberman v. Federal Insurance Company.

The fraudster in that case sent spoofed e-mails in 2012 to an accounting firm purporting to be from one of the firm’s clients. At the “client’s” request, the accounting firm executed two wire transfers from the client’s bank account, over which the firm had power of attorney, in amounts just under $100,000 each to banks in Malaysia and Singapore. The firm finally detected the scheme when it called the client for confirmation after receiving a third e-mail requesting another transfer of $128,000 to Malaysia. The accounting firm was able to recover most of the first wire transfer but nothing from the second, resulting in a $100,000 loss to the client’s account, which the firm restored.

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FTC and Wyndham Call a Truce

data breach

Following the Third Circuit’s ruling upholding the FTC’s authority to regulate unfair and deceptive cybersecurity practices under Section 5 of the FTC Act, Wyndham Worldwide Corporation and the FTC have agreed to settle.  This marks the end to a hotly-contested and closely-watched case at the cross-roads of data security and regulatory enforcement.

As reported in our previous posts on this topic, Wyndham experienced three breaches of its systems in 2008 and 2009 resulting in the exposure of approximately 619,000 consumers’ credit card numbers.  The FTC initiated an enforcement action in 2012 alleging that Wyndham engaged in unfair and deceptive cybersecurity practices in violation of Section 5 of the FTC Act.  The FTC asserted that Wyndham’s cybersecurity practices were deficient in myriad ways that placed consumer data at risk of theft, for example, by storing payment card information in clear text, using weak and default passwords across networks, failing to install or misconfiguring firewalls, failing to adequately restrict vendor access to corporate networks, and failing to follow appropriate incident response procedures after successive cyberattacks.

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EU Reaches Agreement On New Data Protection Laws

After nearly 4 years of negotiations, yesterday evening the EU reached agreement on the final provisions of its new data protection laws. With it, a new era of data protection has been ushered in that will have far reaching consequences for organisations both inside and outside of the EU.

In January 2012, the European Commission put forward its proposals for data protection reform, which included text for a new General Data Protection Regulation. Following negotiations this year with the European Parliament and the Council (the so-called ‘trilogues’ meetings), the three institutions reached final agreement on the Regulation’s provisions late last night.

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A Great Leap Forward: EU Soon to Have Broad Rules on Cybersecurity and Incident Reporting

European Union

On December 7, 2015, more than two and a half years after the first draft, the European Union Council finally reached an important, informal agreement with the Parliament on important network and information security rules (“NIS-Directive”) affecting companies across the EU.  The culmination of the European Commission’s Cybersecurity strategy effort that began in February 2013 with the European Commission’s proposed draft directive on measures to ensure a common level of network and information security.  Final adoption of the NIS-Directive will have several important consequences, including increased focus by Boards of Directors of cybersecurity risk, the need for companies to increase their investment in information security, to prepare and implement cybersecurity incident response plans, to conduct internal comprehensive investigations into the circumstances of a cybersecurity event in order to comply with forthcoming reporting obligations.

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“Don’t Go There”: Second Circuit Makes it Harder to Bring Claims against Former Employees who Take Company Information without Permission

computer fraud

On December 3, the Second Circuit Court of Appeals became the most recent entrant into the circuit conflict on the question of when and under what circumstances an employee’s use of a computer to gain access to unauthorized information constitutes a violation of the Computer Fraud and Abuse Act.  Over a dissent, the Court held that an employee cannot be convicted of violating the CFAA when he uses a database, to which he has been granted access, in a manner that is prohibited by company policy.  With the Second Circuit joining the Fourth and Ninth Circuits in the minority on the issue, the answer continues to turn on the jurisdiction in which the suit was brought.  Employers should take note because the decision reinforces the need to consider carefully whether and how to limit employee access to sensitive company information within its network—e.g., by use of written policy or technical access restrictions—and how those protections will play out in court if an employee takes company information for use in future employment.

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The Cybersecurity Playbook: Building Effective Attack and Breach Preparedness

inside the minds

With the most significant of cyberattacks resulting in millions of dollars in costs, irreparable damage to a company’s brand, and key executives getting fired, organizations must begin to prepare for what most experts think is the inevitable breach. And yet, when it comes to cybersecurity, many still think of it like physical security: a matter for professionals to handle by fencing in a campus perimeter, putting the most important entry points under lock and key, and assigning someone to monitor the video surveillance.

But cybersecurity does not work like physical security. In the “The Cybersecurity Playbook: Building Effective Attack and Breach Preparedness” chapter of “Understanding Developments in Cyberspace Law: Leading Lawyers on Analyzing Recent Trends, Case Laws, and Legal Strategies Affecting the Internet Landscape” we explore strategies to reduce the likelihood of a breach but more importantly mitigate the harm whether it be reputational, legal, or key job losses that can all too often arrive in the wake of a data breach.

DoD Cybersecurity Rules Expand Contractors’ and Other DoD Awardees’ Obligations to Safeguard Sensitive Data and Report Cyber Incidents

Overview

The United States Department of Defense (“DoD”) recently published two new rules that impose broader obligations to safeguard information that falls within specified categories of sensitive data and to report cyber incidents to the government.  These rules generally apply to companies that have been awarded new DoD procurement contracts, that hold subcontracts under such DoD contracts, or, in some cases, that have been awarded other types of agreements with DoD.  The rules:

  • expand contractors’ and subcontractors’ safeguarding responsibilities and obligations to report and investigate cyber threats;
  • modify the scope of data that contractors and subcontractors must safeguard and the universe of contractors and subcontractors to which the requirements apply;
  • establish requirements for contractors and subcontractors using cloud computing to provide information technology services to DoD, including requiring such contractors to keep government data within the United States, implement DoD-approved safeguards, and limit disclosure of and access to government data;
  • expand and make mandatory DoD’s previously voluntary cyber incident reporting system for defense industrial base (“DIB”) agreement holders; and
  • open DoD’s voluntary cybersecurity information sharing program up to a greater range of agreement holders.

The new rules reflect DoD’s intensified focus on treatment of export controlled technology and other categories of sensitive data.  Awardees of DoD procurement contracts, subcontracts, and other types of instruments such as cooperative agreements are well-advised to make their data-security and export control compliance programs comport with these new requirements.

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FTC/FCC MOU: Even the Justice League Needs It In Writing

data security

On November 13, 2015, the Federal Trade Commission and the Federal Communications Commission entered into a Memorandum of Understanding to address coordination of consumer protection actions by each agency.  Following a wave of what observers perceive as a turf battle between the FTC and FCC (namely the reclassification of broadband internet access services as a common carrier service outside the FTC’s jurisdiction), and a dramatic increase in FCC data security regulatory enforcement actions, the MOU suggests that the FTC and FCC are in fact serious about cooperation and collaboration, especially on data security issues.  Although organizations have better transparency and predictability in the enforcement landscape, they should also anticipate more sophisticated investigations based on richer data and improved investigative techniques.

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“Cybersecurity Guide Navigating the Digital Age” – Cyber Risks to Board of Directors

In the wake of high-profile cyberattacks, boards of directors are increasingly being scrutinized by regulators, shareholders, and the public over their oversight of cybersecurity risk.  In a chapter of “Navigating the Digital Age: The Definitive Cybersecurity Guide for Directors and Officers” – a first-of-its kind publication by the New York Stock Exchange –  we explore the legal obligations of boards of directors and board members to oversee cybersecurity risk, the potential exposure that boards face in the current cybersecurity landscape if they do not meet those obligations, and strategies that boards may consider in mitigating that risk to strengthen the corporation and their standing as dutiful directors.