Antony Kim

Partner

Washington, D.C.


Read full biography at www.orrick.com

Antony (Tony) Kim is a partner in Orrick's internationally recognized Cyber, Privacy & Data Innovation practice, which pursues "an aggressive yet practical approach" to data protection and innovation that "meets the needs of both in-house counsel and tech-savvy business clients."

When faced with a cyber crisis, companies call on Tony to help navigate critical legal, risk and reputational landmines. Tony has helped clients respond to hundreds of cyberattacks and data breaches. He has directed forensic investigations, cross-border notifications, and regulatory and private enforcement matters, in connection with incidents involving personal data of employees and customers, including PCI/payment card data, as well as proprietary data and corporate trade secrets, on behalf of private and public companies as well as governmental entities. 

Tony has also defended over fifty clients in regulatory investigations and enforcement actions by the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) and State Attorneys General.  These matters have involved (i) cyberattacks and data breach incidents, (ii) privacy implications of innovative data use-cases, and (iii) consumer protection issues relating to online and offline sales & marketing and advertising practices -- particularly in the retail e-commerce and fintech/consumer finance industries.  Tony draws insights from his regulatory practice to inform his counseling work, where he regularly advises Legal, InfoSec/IT, Product/Marketing, and C-Suite/Board stakeholders on a host of governance, compliance, and risk mitigation strategies.

Recognized as a leading lawyer, Tony has been ranked in Chambers USA, The Legal 500 US, Benchmark Litigation, The Cybersecurity Docket and Super Lawyers D.C. Rising Stars. He’s been consistently named to The Cybersecurity Docket’s “Incident Response 30” list of the top IR professionals in the U.S. Clients endorse Tony, telling Chambers “He's fantastic,” “He takes the time to tend to companies’ needs and understands clients’ objectives.” The National Law Journal named Tony to its 2014 list of D.C. Rising Stars, a 40-under-40 group of “game changing” private, government and public interest attorneys. Based on surveys of senior in-house counsel, Tony was awarded the Client Choice Award by the International Law Office (ILO)/Lexology in 2015, and was named an Acritas Star Lawyer in 2016 and 2017. In 2016, Law360 named Orrick’s Cyber, Privacy & Data Innovation practice “Practice Group of the Year” in the data privacy category. Chambers repeatedly ranks Orrick’s Cyber and Privacy practice in Band 1 and in 2019 named Orrick the “Privacy/Data Security Law Firm of the Year.”

Tony serves on the firm's Executive Management Committee.

Posts by: Antony P. Kim

FRAUD ALERT: PAYMENT PROCESSORS AND ISOs MUST ENSURE THAT THEIR COMPLIANCE PROCEDURES CAN DETECT COVID-19 FRAUD

The Federal Trade Commission (“FTC”) plans to aggressively police companies that use deceptive marketing to take advantage of consumers’ fears relating to the COVID-19 pandemic. The FTC is focused on a broad range of potential deceptive practices, including unapproved or unsubstantiated health claims, work-at-home schemes, finance schemes, and misrepresentations as to the current availability of in-demand products, such as cleaning, household, and health or medical supplies. The FTC has already issued warning letters to seven sellers of unapproved and misbranded products who claimed that their products could treat or prevent the coronavirus, and additional warning letters or enforcement actions are likely to follow as the pandemic progresses and economic uncertainty increases. READ MORE

California AG Releases More Modifications to CCPA Regulations

On March 11, 2020, the California Attorney General, Xavier Becerra, (“California AG”) released a second set of modifications to the proposed regulations pursuant to the California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (“CCPA”). These recent modifications reflect some minor changes and clarifications from the first set of modifications to the proposed regulations (published on February 10, 2020).[1]

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How to Move to Remote Work and Comply with U.S. Privacy and Cybersecurity Laws

Cybercriminals are known to attack networks and individuals at inopportune times of crisis—and the coronavirus pandemic unfortunately presents just such an opportunity as millions are accessing corporate networks and databases from home. This past weekend New Jersey and Connecticut joined the growing list of jurisdictions (e.g., California, Delaware, Illinois, Louisiana, Ohio, and New York) to issue orders effectively requiring non-essential workers to avoid the workplace, and in some cases, to shelter-in-place. READ MORE

Contractors Scrambling to Scope New DoD Cyber Framework

On January 30, 2020, the U.S. Department of Defense (“DoD”) released Version 1.0 of its Cybersecurity Maturity Model Certification (“CMMC”) framework (CMMC overview here; CMMC Version 1.0 and appendices here).  By 2026, DoD plans to require CMMC certification for all defense contracts.  For companies looking to play a role – any role – in the defense industry supply chain, now is the time to develop, assess, and augment cybersecurity practices.

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FTC Rings in New Year with ‘Major Changes’ to Cybersecurity Orders and Throwback Reference to WISPs

Earlier this month, Andrew Smith, the FTC’s Director of the Bureau of Consumer Protection, announced that the Commission had made “three major changes” to its data security orders.[1] Citing recent hearings at the FTC, as well as the Commission’s defeat in the closely watched LabMD case,[2] Director Smith highlighted three key takeaways from seven consent orders announced against “an array of diverse companies.”[3]

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Google to Pay $57 Million for GDPR Violations

 

On January 21, 2019, the French data protection supervisory authority (“CNIL”) fined Google €50 million (approximately $57 million) for violating the European General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”). The fine penalizes Google for failing to comply with the GDPR’s transparency and notice requirements, and for failing to properly obtain consent from users for ads personalization. This is the largest GDPR fine imposed to date and the first action against a major global tech player. The CNIL’s decision sends an important message to companies that tough enforcement actions are not just a theoretical threat. Companies should look closer at data protection compliance and particularly work on their notices and consent forms. READ MORE

California Sets the Standard With a New IoT Law

This past September Governor Brown signed into law Senate Bill 327, which is the first state law designed to regulate the security features of Internet of Things (IoT) devices. The bill sets minimum security requirements for connected device manufacturers, and provides for enforcement by the California Attorney General. The law will come into effect on January 1, 2020, provided that the state legislature passes Assembly Bill 1906, which is identical to Senate Bill 327. READ MORE

Making Your Head Spin: “Clean Up” Bill Amends the California Consumer Privacy Act, Delaying Enforcement But Making Class Litigation Even MORE Likely

The California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 (the “CCPA” or the “Act”), which we reported on here and here continues to make headlines as the California legislature fast-tracked a “clean up” bill to amend the CCPA before the end of the 2018 legislative session. In a flurry of legislative activity, the amendment bill (“SB 1121” or the “Amendment”) was revised at least twice in the last week prior to its passage late in the evening on August 31, just hours before the legislative session came to a close. The Amendment now awaits the governor’s signature.

Although many were hoping for substantial clarification on many of the Act’s provisions, the Amendment focuses primarily on cleaning up the text of the hastily-passed CCPA, and falls far short of addressing many of the more substantive questions raised by companies and industry advocates as to the Act’s applicability and implementation. READ MORE

Did California Open (Another) Floodgate for Breach Litigation?

Game-changing Calif. Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 puts statutory breach damages on the table

The recently-enacted California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018 is a game-changer in a number of respects.  The Act imports European GDPR-style rights around data ownership, transparency, and control.  It also contains features that are new to the American privacy landscape, including “pay-for-privacy” (i.e., financial incentives for the collection, sale, and even deletion of personal information) and “anti-discrimination” (i.e., prohibition of different pricing or service-levels to consumers who exercise privacy rights, unless such differentials are “reasonably related to the value provided to the consumer of the consumer’s data”).  Privacy teams will be hard at work assessing and implementing compliance in advance of the January 1, 2020 effective date. READ MORE

Understanding Calif.’s Game-Changing Data Protection Law: The California Consumer Privacy Act of 2018

Orrick partners Emily TabatabaiTony Kim and Jennifer Martin authored this article for Corporate Counsel on the sweeping implications for businesses of California’s newly-enacted privacy law. Members of our global Cybersecurity, Privacy and Data Innovation Practice, Emily, Tony and Jennifer outline the reasons the new law will have “a significant impact on core business operations.”

 

Are you ready for the CCPA? Take Orrick’s CCPA Readiness Assessment.

  • Assess your company against CCPA provisions.
  • Receive a complimentary report summarizing the likely key impacts.
  • Use the report to development to develop your CCPA project plan.

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