Data Transfer

Nevada Passes Opt-Out Law, Effective October 2019 – Three Months Before the CCPA

Following in California’s footsteps, Nevada has passed a new privacy law providing consumers the right to opt out of the sale of their personal information. Senate Bill 220 (SB-220), signed into law by Governor Steve Sisolak on May 29, 2019, amends Nevada’s existing online privacy statute, NRS 603A.340, to include a requirement that online operators provide consumers with a means to opt out of the sale of specific personal information collected by websites or online services. The act goes into effect on October 1, 2019 – three months ahead of the January 1, 2020 effective date of the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) – which may force companies to fast track implementation efforts for opt-out requests in particular. READ MORE

Orrick Launches Automated Tool to Assess Readiness for California Consumer Privacy Act

Today, Orrick announced the launch of our automated CCPA Readiness Assessment Tool which helps businesses globally determine whether they are covered by the California Consumer Privacy Act (CCPA) and, if yes, their readiness to comply with the new law that is revolutionizing the United States privacy landscape. This free tool is available to all organizations and takes 10-30 minutes to complete.  It segments the CCPA into five workable themes and guides users through a series of dynamic questions relating to each theme. Upon completion of the questionnaire, the tool provides a free and comprehensive readiness assessment tailored to the business’s unique positioning and individual needs.

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World’s “Largest Area of Safe Data Flow” Created by Japan and the European Union

The EU-Japan Economic Partnership Agreement between Japan and the European Union (“EU”) recently came into force, creating the world’s biggest open trading zone that covers 635 million people and almost one-third of the world’s total GDP. In the shadow of that agreement, however, another development—the mutual acknowledgment of data protection standards—took place, which should not be overlooked because it sets another world record. On January 23, 2019, the European Commission adopted its adequacy decision on Japan, acknowledging that Japan provides for an adequate level of data protection. Similarly, effective January 23, 2019, the Japanese independent data protection authority, the Personal Information Protection Commission (“PPC”), has also designated countries within the European Economic Area as having an equivalent level of data protection. This mutual acknowledgement created what is being referred to as the “largest area of safe data transfer” in the world.

These developments have important benefits for companies transferring data from the EU to Japan and vice versa, reducing burdens and giving companies greater access to customers. Below, we discuss the developments and describe what companies should consider in the future. READ MORE

The CLOUD Act, Explained

The Clarifying Lawful Overseas Use of Data (“CLOUD”) Act was enacted into law on March 23, 2018. The Act provides that U.S. law-enforcement orders issued under the Stored Communications Act (SCA) may reach certain data located in other countries – a key question in United States v. Microsoft Corporation, No. 17-2, a case argued before the Supreme Court on February 27.[1] Both the government and Microsoft recently agreed that the closely watched case is now moot following the CLOUD Act. READ MORE

Orrick Launches Automated GDPR Readiness Tool for Companies

Today, Orrick announced the launch of our automated General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) Readiness Assessment Tool, which makes the EU’s new, complex, data privacy law, the GDPR, more accessible. The free tool is available to all organizations and allows businesses to stress test their compliance against the upcoming GDPR. It segments the GDPR into 14 workable themes and guides the user through a series of dynamic questions relating to each theme. Upon completion of the assessment, the tool provides a complimentary tailored report summarizing the likely key impacts of the GDPR for an organization. READ MORE

10 German Data Privacy Supervisory Authorities Investigating Potential Unlawful International Data Transfers

German Data Privacy Supervisory Authorities Investigating Potential Unalwful International Data Transfers Global Data Transfer Map

According to a press release of the Data Protection Supervisory Authority in the Land Mecklenburg Vorpommern of November 3, German supervisory authorities have randomly selected 500 companies in Germany and sent them requests for information on their international data transfers. The German supervisory authorities are undertaking this coordinated action in order to increase awareness among companies of the need to ensure data privacy compliance of international data transfers.

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EU-U.S. Privacy Shield: Companies Can Now Certify

Privacy Shield

As of, August 1st, 2016, U.S. companies can now join the Safe Harbor successor EU-U.S. Privacy Shield (the “Privacy Shield”) for personal data transfers from the EU to the U.S.

This post gives a high level summary of what companies should consider with the Privacy Shield.

Background:

On July 12, 2016, the European Commission (the “Commission”) formally adopted the adequacy decision necessary to implement the Privacy Shield. This means that transfers of personal data from the EU to the U.S. that are made pursuant to the Privacy Shield’s requirements are lawful under EU law.  The Privacy Shield replaces the EU-U.S. Safe Harbor Framework, which was invalidated by the Court of Justice of the European Union (“CJEU”) on October 6, 2015.

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EU-U.S. Privacy Shield launched by European Commission

EU-US Privacy Shield

After receiving the approval of the EU Member States, through the Article 31 Committee, last Friday, the European Commission has today, July 12th, 2016, formally adopted the Adequacy Decision necessary to implement the EU-U.S. Privacy Shield (the Decision).

The Decision will be notified to Member States today and, as such, will be effective immediately.

The adoption process had stalled in recent months due to ongoing concerns about the access to personal data by public authorities in the U.S.  You can read about some of these concerns in our previous blog post.

The European Commission has received further commitments from the U.S. and has agreed clarifications and improvements on the bulk collection of data, strengthening the Ombudsperson mechanism and more explicit obligations on companies as regards limits on retention and onward transfers.  Those commitments and clarifications have been sufficient to allay the EU member states, at least for now.

The Privacy Shield is subject to an annual review mechanism.

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EU-U.S. Privacy Shield Approved by EU Member States

safe harbor

Today the EU-U.S. Privacy Shield was approved by the EU Member States, which sets the stage for the European Commission to grant final approval to the Privacy Shield as a basis for EU-U.S. transfers of personal data.

This development follows criticisms of the Privacy Shield this past April from the Article 29 Working Party, an advisory group comprised of the EU privacy regulators. We summarized the primary criticisms in a prior blog post.  The Working Party was responding to the draft adequacy decision that was released by the European Commission on February 29, 2016, which we summarized here. The revisions to the Privacy Shield are intended to address the criticisms of the Working Party but it is not yet clear if the criticisms have been fully reflected.

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A Shifting Cybersecurity Landscape in the European Union

EU data privacy

Orrick Attorneys Aravind Swaminathan, Kolvin Stone and Christian Schröder recently discussed how impending changes to EU data privacy laws will fundamentally change how European companies respond in the face of a cyber attack or data breach.  The article examines the cyber threat landscape and suggests how EU companies should assemble the right individuals into an incident response team for dealing with a data breach.  Drawing on their experience managing client data breaches in the United States, the authors provide concrete strategies for EU companies to deal with a data breach—before, during, and after the event.  For more on how to prepare for the impending changes to EU data privacy laws, click here.