Cyber Insurance

Federal District Court Finds No Cyber Insurance Coverage For Costly Credit Card Fraud Assessments

In one of the first court decisions to analyze in depth the coverage provided by a cyber policy, a federal judge has found that PF Chang’s policy came up short.  Following a 2014 data breach in which hackers accessed and posted online 60,000 credit card numbers belonging to PF Chang’s customers, the company sought coverage under its “CyberSecurity by Chubb” insurance policy.  Although PF Chang’s insurer, Federal Insurance Company (“Federal”), agreed to reimburse nearly $1.7 million for customer claims and other breach-related expenses, it refused to reimburse an additional $2 million in fees and assessments levied against P.F. Chang’s by the credit card brands.  Last week a federal district judge in Arizona, applying Arizona law, denied PF Chang’s claim for reimbursement and granted summary judgment for Federal.  While it held that these fees and assessments fell within the scope of coverage, the court held that the “contractual liability” exclusion barred coverage.

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Cyber Insurance: An Overview of an Evolving Coverage

Cyber Insurance

Cyber insurance has reached a tipping point. The rising costs faced by data breach victims, which can exceed $100 million for the largest breaches, have spurred an increasing number of companies across industries to turn to cyber insurance in an effort to transfer at least some of those costs to an insurer. But cyber insurance is still relatively new, at least as a mass-market insurance product, and it is evolving quickly, although not as quickly as the threat itself. The policies are complex and not standardized, and courts have yet to provide any guidance about what will be covered and what will not. This state of affairs leaves many companies that have or are considering buying cyber insurance uncertain—not only whether they will be a victim of a data breach but also whether insurance will provide them with the coverage they need if they do become a victim.

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Does the Schrems Decision Open the Door to New Cyber Insurance Exclusions?

The shockwaves continue from the October 6, 2015 ruling of the Court of Justice of the European Union (CJEU), the European Union’s highest court, invalidating the U.S.-EU “Safe Harbor” data transfer regime in a controversy arising out of Maximillian Schrems’ complaint to the Irish Data Protection Commissioner. The Schrems decision obviously has huge privacy implications for companies that transferred data under the Safe Harbor regime, but it may also impact such companies’ cyber insurance.

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When a Cyber Attack Has Physical Impact

cyber attack

October ordinarily brings the return of crisp air, fall foliage, and Halloween.  This year, for the first time, it also brings National Cyber Security Awareness Month.  Yet designating a month to increase cybersecurity awareness seems redundant.  We are reminded almost daily of the importance of cybersecurity, as media reports of cyber breaches have become commonplace.  Of course, the most widely reported cyber incidents have been data privacy breaches that have affected tens of millions of consumers nationwide.  These are the sorts of incidents that have spawned a growing market for so-called “cyber policies” (although as we wrote recently, the CEO of one of the largest insurers has acknowledged that cyber insurance capacity remains relatively small).

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