europe

Marriott Secures 80% Reduction in ICO Fine, but Here’s What You Missed…

Hot on the heels of the £20 million fine issued to British Airways, the Information Commissioner’s Office (“ICO“) has issued Marriott International Inc. (“Marriott“) with a long-awaited penalty notice for its failure to ensure appropriate security of the personal data it processed. The global hotel chain has been fined £18.4 million, which is a substantial reduction from the £99.2 million contemplated by the ICO’s notice of intention to fine. Unfortunately, the decision failed to give any detailed explanation for the reduction in the level of the fine from £99.2 million to £28 million. Although, a further 20% reduction to £22.4 million was designed to acknowledge Marriott’s cooperation, and a further £2 million reduction was to reflect the impact of the coronavirus pandemic. READ MORE

International Transfers at Risk – The EDPB’s Guidelines on International Transfers Post-Schrems II

On November 11, 2020, the European Data Protection Board (EDPB) published its long-awaited guidance on what parties to international data transfers should be doing to perform such transfers in a manner compliant with the Regulation (EU) 2016/679 (the General Data Protection Regulation or GDPR) in light of the European Court of Justice’s (CJEU) decision in Case C-311/18 Data Protection Commissioner v Facebook Ireland and Maximillian Schrems (Schrems II).

Unfortunately, the draft guidelines provide no panacea for companies engaged in international data transfers of personal data from the EEA to third countries. Instead, organizations face 55 pages of guidance that provide few workable solutions for international data transferors—apart from a lengthy protocol for conducting risk assessments. READ MORE

Upcoming Webinar: Data, Privacy and Cyber Security Issues in International Arbitration

Join Orrick and the Silicon Valley Arbitration and Mediation Center (SVAMC) on November 4, 2020, for a complimentary webinar on how arbitration can deal with substantive data, privacy and cyber issues arising in international disputes. Orrick’s James Hargrove (International Arbitration partner/Geneva and London) and Keily Blair (Cyber, Privacy & Data Innovation partner/London) will join other panelists to address current topics in arbitrating data and cyber issues, for example, arbitrability, mass arbitrations, multiplicity of proceedings, follow-on claims from data breaches, territorial limitations, interim and final relief and sanctions, future issues – how will arbitration deal with the ever-growing importance and value of data. Keily, James and their fellow panelists will put an up-to-date focus on data, privacy and cyber issues in arbitration proceedings, with a discussion of current practices, remote hearings and technological advances, hearings protocols, increased cyber risks and steps to protect data integrity.  Learn more and register here.

Webinar  |  November 4, 2020  |  12:00pm – 1:00pm EST

Exemplary and Record-Breaking: After a Two-Year Investigation, the UK’s ICO Issues British Airways with Its Largest Fine to Date (£20m)

When British Airways (“BA”) suffered a significant personal data breach in September 2018, just months after the coming into force of the EU General Data Protection Regulation (“GDPR”), all eyes were on the UK’s Information Commissioner’s Office (“ICO”). Would the ICO use the UK’s flagship airline as a “poster child” for post GDPR enforcement? Was this the moment that much-hyped fines of up to 4% of global turnover come to pass? READ MORE

UK National Data Strategy: A Step in the Wrong Direction for EU Data Adequacy?

In September 2020, the UK government published its National Data Strategy (“NDS”), aiming to use data to boost the UK economy and to “unlock the power of data for the UK,” particularly in light of Brexit. The NDS is intended to set out the UK’s government focus on data, following the recent announcement that responsibility for government use of data will move from the Department for Digital Culture Media and Sport to the Cabinet Office. READ MORE

SWISS-U.S. PRIVACY SHIELD: SCHREMS 2.0’S LATEST VICTIM?

Following the CJEU’s invalidation of the EU Commission’s adequacy decision on the EU-U.S. Privacy Shield in Schrems 2.0, on  September 8, 2020, the Federal Data Protection and Information Commissioner (FDPIC) found that the Swiss-U.S. Privacy Shield does not meet the data protection standards set by the country’s Federal Act on Data Protection (FADP). READ MORE

Face-off on Use of Biometric Technology in the UK

In one of the world’s first test cases regarding the legality of the use of automated facial recognition and biometric technology, on 11 August 2020 the English Court of Appeal handed down judgment in R (Bridges) v CC South Wales. The court found that the use of this technology by the South Wales Police Force violated privacy, equality and data protection laws. READ MORE

Privacy Shield Sunk – SCCs Treading Water: What Can Companies Do to Keep Their Head Above Water

Today the European Court of Justice (CJEU) published its highly anticipated judgement in the case of Data Protection Commissioner Ireland v Facebook Ireland Limited, Maximillian Schrems, colloquially known as “Schrems 2.0”. There were three key elements to the decision:

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Schrems 2.0 – The Next Big Blow for EU-US Data Flows? – What to Expect on Thursday, July 16th

Whatever the outcome of Schrems 2.0, the key takeaway is, don’t panic.

Tomorrow, July 16, 2020, the European Court of Justice (CJEU) is expected to rule in the case of Data Protection Commissioner Ireland v Facebook Ireland Limited, Maximillian Schrems, colloquially known as “Schrems 2.0”.

The main ingredients haven’t changed much for this long-awaited sequel to the decision that invalidated the Safe Harbor regime in 2015: Austrian data protection activist Max Schrems, Facebook Ireland, Ltd, and another commonly used international personal data transfer mechanism on the chopping block for invalidation.

This time around the court is considering the validity of the Standard Contractual Clauses (SCC) adopted by the European Commission, which goes beyond EU-U.S. transfers and could affect most agreements governing data sharing between the EU and the rest of the world. Regardless of the outcome, tomorrow’s decision is going to have a profound impact on the way international data transfers are treated for years to come – but the key takeaway is not to panic. In this blog post, we have set out the three potential rulings open to the CJEU and what steps you can take to following such a ruling. READ MORE

Highest Administrative Court in France Upholds Google’s €50 Million Fine

On January 21, 2019, the CNIL (the French data protection authority) issued a fine of €50 million to Google under the General Data Protection Regulation (the “GDPR”) for its failure to (1) provide notice in an easily accessible form, using clear language, when users configured their Android mobile device, and (2) obtain users’ consent to process personal data for ad personalization purposes. The CNIL’s enforcement action and resulting fine arose out of actions filed by two not-for-profit associations, None of Your Business and La Quadrature du Net. The fine was the first significant fine imposed by the CNIL under the GDPR and remains one of the highest fines to date. In determining the amount of the fine, the CNIL considered the fact that the violations related to essential principles under the GDPR (transparency and consent), the violations were continuing, the importance of the Android operating system in France, and the fact that the privacy notice presented to users covered a number of processing operations. Google appealed the decision. READ MORE