Ellen Shulock Caro

Managing Associate

San Francisco


Read full biography at www.orrick.com

Ellen Caro is a litigation associate in Orrick’s San Francisco office. Her practice focuses on complex commercial and antitrust litigation. She also has experience with employment litigation, including discrimination, harassment and trade secret disputes.

While in law school, Ellen served as a legal intern in the Civil Division of the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Northern District of California and the Massachusetts Attorney General’s Office. Before law school, she worked as a paralegal for the Antitrust Division of the U.S. Department of Justice in San Francisco.

Ellen's representative engagements include the following:

  • Represents Microsoft Corporation in multiple antitrust and commercial actions in California and elsewhere in the United States and abroad.
  • Represents Netflix in a dispute involving Netflix's recruitment of employees from a competitor and the legality of the competitor's employment contracts.
  • Represents Delta Dental in connection with challenges to Delta’s contractual relations with its member dentists.
  • Represented a medical device manufacturer in a lawsuit alleging harassment and discrimination brought by a former temporary contract worker.
  • Represented various consumer electronics companies in litigation alleging trade secret misappropriation in connection with the hiring of plaintiffs’ former employees.

Posts by: Ellen Caro

TOTAL ECLIPSE EDITION: Trade Secret Disputes That Are Out of This World

Take off your eclipse glasses, close that NASA photo gallery, and stop thinking about how “path of totality” would make an awesome band name: it’s time to get back to work. As the country recovers from Eclipse Mania 2017, we take a look at some space-related trade secrets cases.

Turn Around…

Someone might be stealing your trade secrets behind your back! A federal court found that’s what happened to Pacific Aerospace & Electronic, Inc. (PAE), a company that designs components for electronic circuitry in the aerospace and space exploration industries and whose products are used on the Hubble Telescope and the International Space Shuttle.  According to PAE, the specialized nature of its business makes the identity of its customers—who are relatively few in number—critical to its business success.  That’s why it was a problem when two PAE employees who had access to proprietary information about PAE’s technologies and customers left for a rival company, RAAD Technologies, Inc.  One of the former employees allegedly copied backup tapes of design information weeks before leaving, and both employees allegedly compiled a list of prospective customers after leaving which they gave to RAAD’s sales representative for use in soliciting business.  PAE brought a claim for misappropriation of trade secrets (among others) against these former employees and RAAD in the Western District of Washington, and moved for a preliminary injunction.  The court ruled that PAE’s detailed customer information was a protectable trade secret, and that PAE risked irreparable harm in the absence of an injunction and would likely prevail on the merits of its misappropriation claim.  However, the court limited the scope of injunctive relief only to future misuse of the trade secret customer list, rather than ongoing misuse—i.e., continued sales to wrongfully-acquired customers—as PAE had requested.  The court reasoned that given the importance of PAE’s (and later RAAD’s) customers, public interest concerns favored permitting these ongoing business relationships and remedying any harm by an award of monetary damages.

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Diamonds Are Forever, but Joint Ventures Are Not: Court Finds Claims Preempted by CUTSA in Business Deal Gone Bad

The holiday season is officially upon us: peppermint mochas have popped up on coffee shop menus, carols ring from department store speakers, and you can’t turn on the television without seeing at least three diamond commercials. But it’s not all yuletide and merriment for those in the diamond business. As one diamond importer and wholesaler recently learned, sometimes instead of a gem you get a lump of coal—in this case, from the Northern District of California, which tossed out certain claims against a former business partner on the grounds those claims were preempted by the California Uniform Trade Secrets Act. READ MORE

Haven’t You Heard? Trade Secret Theft Can Occur in Unusual Ways

A recent development from the 3D printing world reminds us that threats of trade secret misappropriation are more varied than cyber-espionage or the disgruntled employee taking confidential information to a competitor. With exciting new technologies come “exciting” new ways to steal trade secrets. Sometimes all it takes to steal a secret is being a good listener. READ MORE

For Here or To Go? Senators Introduce Bill to Ban Noncompete Agreements, Increase Mobility For Sandwich Makers and Other Low-Wage Workers

Congress is getting into the non-compete business.  Citing the use of non-compete agreements by companies such as Jimmy John’s sandwich shops, Senate Democrats recently introduced a bill—called the Mobility and Opportunity for Vulnerable Employees (MOVE) Act—that would amend the Fair Labor Standards Act (FLSA) to prohibit the use of non-compete agreements for low-wage employees. READ MORE

WORLD SERIES EDITION: These Trade Secrets Are Going, Going, Gone

Ah, October: the time of crisp fall air, brightly colored leaves, and pumpkin spice-flavored everything. And, of course, the World Series quest that can unite a city—or, in the case of Orrick’s San Francisco and Washington, D.C. offices, give rise to a friendly wager (sorry, D.C.!). In honor of the baseball playoffs, we take a look at some trade secret issues related to our national pastime.
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NEW YEAR’S RESOLUTION EDITION: As Americans Trudge to the Gym, We Review Trade Secrets Fights in the “New You” Industry

The gyms are packed, the diet cookbooks are flying off the shelves, and smokers are struggling to kick the habit.  It’s the resolution season, and surveys say half of the top 10 most popular new year’s goals aim for better health.  Entire industries exist to serve these pledges:  everywhere you look, someone is touting a new diet or exercise “secret.”  Some of these “new-you” purveyors claim their formulas are actually trade secrets, and have gone to court to protect them.  But are they really so secret? READ MORE