Shannon C. Leong

Managing Associate

San Francisco


Read full biography at www.orrick.com
Shannon Leong, a managing associate in the San Francisco office, is a member of the Litigation Divison. Her practice focuses on complex commercial and antitrust litigation, as well as antitrust counseling and compliance.

Shannon devotes a significant portion of her practice to pro bono matters, including habeas proceedings, civil rights issues, death penalty litigation, and asylum petitions. Notably, she helped to secure the exoneration and release of George Souliotes, an innocent client who had been wrongfully convicted and imprisoned for more than 16 years, for which she received a California Attorney of the Year award in 2014. She also worked on legislation banning the shackling of pregnant women in California jails, and continues to work with the American Civil Liberties Union on reproductive justice issues.

Prior to joining Orrick, Shannon was a litigation fellow at the American Civil Liberties Union of Northern California. She also has experience in indigent defense with the Office of the Appellate Defender in New York, and has worked as a human rights advocate with the Forum for Women, Law and Development, a nonprofit organization based in Kathmandu, Nepal.

Posts by: Shannon Leong

Judge Mostly Denies Deutsche Bank National Trust Co.’s Motion to Dismiss in RMBS Class Action

On February 3, Judge Alison Nathan of the United States District Court for the Southern District of New York largely denied Deutsche Bank National Trust Co.’s (the “Trustee’s”) motion to dismiss in a proposed class action brought by Royal Park Investments SA/NV over $3.1 billion in losses in residential mortgage-backed securities.  Royal Park alleged that the Trustee failed to require the loan sellers to repurchase or substitute loans when it became aware that the underlying mortgages were defaulting.  Judge Nathan rejected the Trustee’s argument that Royal Park failed to make a written demand to initiate a repurchase action as required in the trusts’ pooling and service agreements, holding that the Trustee had an obligation to provide notice to the other parties when it independently discovered breaches of representations and warranties.  Judge Nathan did, however, dismiss Royal Park’s derivative claims on behalf of 10 trusts that held the loans because the suit was direct rather than derivative in nature.  Order.

Morgan Stanley Settles RMBS Litigation with FDIC for $63M

On January 29, Morgan Stanley and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation agreed to settle five suits encompassing state and federal claims alleging that Morgan Stanley made misrepresentations in offering residential mortgage-backed securities to three now-defunct banks.  Morgan Stanley will pay $63 million to the FDIC, as receiver for Colonial Bank of Montgomery, Alabama, Security Savings Bank of Henderson, New York, and United Western Bank of Denver, Colorado.  Morgan Stanley denied all liability regarding the claims, and the settlement agreement specified that the parties settled in order to avoid further litigation.  The settlement was reached in coordination with the Department of Justice.  Settlement and Release Agreement.

Morgan Stanley Settles RMBS Suits With NCUA

On December 10, 2015, the National Credit Union Administration (“NCUA”) announced Morgan Stanley’s agreement to pay $225 million to settle litigation brought in New York and Kansas federal courts by NCUA as liquidating agent of U.S. Central Federal Credit Union, Western Corporate Federal Credit Union, Members United Corporate Federal Credit Union, and Southwest Corporate Federal Credit Union (the “Credit Unions”), all of which failed during the financial crisis.  In the settled claims – previously covered here and here – NCUA alleged that Morgan Stanley had materially misrepresented the collateral characteristics of RMBS it sold to the Credit Unions.  Morgan Stanley did not admit fault in the settlement. Press release.

FDIC Sues BNY Mellon For Alleged Failure As Trustee of RMBS

On August 19, 2015, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp., acting as receiver for Guaranty Bank, filed suit against Bank of New York Mellon Corp. in New York federal court, alleging that BNY breached its duties as trustee of 12 RMBS trusts that issued approximately $2 billion in certificates.  The trusts were sponsored by Countrywide Home Loans and EMC Mortgage Corp.  The FDIC alleges that BNY breached its contractual obligations by failing to provide notice of representation and warranty violations and demand Countrywide and EMC to replace or buy back the noncompliant loans, provided false regulatory certifications and remittance reports, and failed to take possession of complete mortgage files.  The FDIC asserts claims for breach of contract, the federal Trust Indenture Act, and the New York Streit Act.  Complaint.

Union Pension Fund Requests Approval of Settlement With Goldman Sachs in RMBS Litigation

On August 13, 2015, union pension fund NECA-IBEW Health & Welfare (“NECA”) and the Police and Fire Retirement Systems of the City of Detroit (“PFRS”), acting on behalf of proposed classes of institutional and individual investors, requested preliminary approval for a $272 million settlement with Goldman Sachs Group Inc.  The proposed settlement would conclude lawsuits in which NECA and PFRS alleged that Goldman Sachs had made numerous misstatements about the loans underlying $6 billion in RMBS offerings.  Stipulation and Agreement of SettlementMemorandum ISO Preliminary Approval.

New York Appellate Court Upholds ACA’s Fraud Suit Against Goldman Sachs

On August 18, 2015, the New York Appellate Division’s First Department held that ACA Financial Guaranty Corp. adequately pled its fraud suit against Goldman Sachs Group Inc.  A four-judge panel held that ACA sufficiently alleged that Goldman Sachs’ allegedly false statements about hedge fund Paulson & Co.’s short position on the Abacus collateralized debt obligation transaction were material, that the statements were made with the requisite intent, and that ACA would not have provided the financial guaranty for the deal had it known the truth.  The case had been remanded from the New York Court of Appeals, which had overturned the First Department’s prior decision to grant Goldman Sachs’ motion to dismiss.  Order.