FDIC

Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation Releases Economic Scenarios for 2020 Stress Testing

 

On February 14, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) released the hypothetical economic scenarios for use in the upcoming stress tests for covered institutions with total consolidated assets of more than $250 billion. Required by the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010, the economic stress test scenarios include 28 variables – such as gross domestic product, the unemployment rate, stock market prices, and interest rates – covering domestic and international activity designed to assess the strength and resilience of financial institutions. Release.

Federal Bank Regulatory Agencies Issue Final Rule on Treatment of High Volatility Commercial Real Estate

 

On November 19, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC), the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) and the Federal Reserve Board (FRB) implemented a final rule addressing high volatility commercial real estate (HVCRE).  The rule aims to clarify the definition of HVCRE exposure and the treatment of credit facilities financing one- to four-family residential properties and land development. Banking institutions will have the option to maintain their current capital treatment for acquisition, development or construction loans originated between January 1, 2015 and the effective date of the final rule on April 1, 2020. FDIC ReleaseFRB ReleaseOCC Release.

 

Agencies Finalize Changes to Supplementary Leverage Ratio as Required by EGRRCPA

 

On November 19, the OCC, the FDIC and the FRB finalized changes that affect a capital requirement for banking organizations performing custodial activities under the Economic Growth, Regulatory Relief, and Consumer Protection Act (EGRRCPA). The EGRRCPA allows banking organizations performing custodial activities to exclude qualifying deposits at certain central banks from their supplementary leverage ratio, with the primary aim to fortify financial stability within the banking system. The rule will be effective on April 1, 2020. FDIC ReleaseFRB ReleaseOCC Release.

 

 

Federal Bank Regulatory Agencies Finalize Rule to Update Calculation of Counterparty Credit Risk for Derivative Contracts

 

On November 19, the OCC, the FDIC and the FRB published a final rule that implements a “standardized approach for measuring counterparty credit risk,” that banking organizations must follow with respect to derivative contracts. This methodology is intended to better reflect the current derivatives market. The final rule will be effective on April 1, 2020. FDIC ReleaseFRB ReleaseOCC Release.

 

Banking Agencies Amend Effective Date for Capital Simplification Final Rule for Non-Advanced Approach Banks

 

On November 13, the OCC, the FDIC and the FRB amended the effective date of the Capital Simplification Final Rule issued on July 22. Banks not subject to the advanced approaches capital rule will be permitted to implement the simplified standards for calculating regulatory capital on January 1, 2020, instead of April 1, 2020, as initially provided. OCC ReleaseFederal Register.

 

Banking Agencies Publish Capital Simplifications for Qualifying Community Banking Organizations

 

On November 13, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC), the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) and the Federal Reserve Board (FRB) published in the Federal Register a final rule creating an optional Community Bank Leverage Ratio (CBLR) framework for measuring capital adequacy of qualifying community banking organizations. Banks that meet the qualifying criteria, including maintaining a leverage ratio greater than 9 percent, and elect to use the CBLR framework will be considered to have met the capital requirements for the “well capitalized” category under the agencies’ Prompt Corrective Action (PCA) framework and will no longer be subject to the generally applicable capital rule. The final rule will become effective on January 1, 2020. OCC ReleaseFederal Register.

 

Agencies Publish Rule Simplifying Capital Calculations for Community Banks

 

On October 29, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) and the Federal Reserve Board (FRB) adopted a final rule that simplifies capital requirements for community banks. The final rule allows community banks with less than $10 billion in total consolidated assets, a leverage ratio of greater than nine percent (9%) and limited amounts of off-balance-sheet exposures and trading assets to adopt a simple leverage ratio to measure their compliance with the capital requirements. The simplified leverage ratio framework removes requirements for calculating and reporting risk-based capital ratios for qualifying community banks that opt into the framework. FDIC Release. Federal Reserve Release.

FDIC Finalizes Rules to Simplify Capital Calculation for Qualifying Community Banking Organizations

 

On September 17, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) finalized a rule that introduces an optional community bank leverage ratio (CBLR) framework for measuring capital adequacy of qualifying community banking organizations. In order to qualify for the CBLR framework, a community banking organization must have a tier 1 leverage ratio of greater than 9 percent, less than $10 billion in total consolidated assets, and limited amounts of off-balance-sheet exposures and trading assets and liabilities. A qualifying community banking organization that opts into the CBLR framework and meets all requirements will be considered to have met the well-capitalized ratio requirements under the Prompt Corrective Action regulations and will not be required to report or calculate risk-based capital. Release. Final Rule.

FDIC Annual Publication Examines Potential Credit and Market Risks

 

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) published its annual review of the primary risk factors facing the banking system, focusing on the categories of credit risk and market risk. The key credit risk identified by the FDIC is increased competition among lenders as loan growth has slowed, posing risk management challenges given market demand for higher-yielding leveraged loan and corporate bond products, resulting in looser underwriting standards. The main market risk recognized in the report is the current interest rate environment. Release. Report.