Michael Disotell

Employment Law Career Associate

Wheeling, W.V. (GOIC)


Read full biography at www.orrick.com

Mike litigates "bet the farm"-style class and collective actions and provides cost-effective solutions to clients with the company's overall business model in mind.

Lawsuits can undermine business strategy.  Mike understands this and approaches legal solutions with a sensitivity towards how litigation may impact the client's overall business goals.  He applies a creative approach in advising clients in several industries, including tech, finance, and retail. 

Currently, Mike is defending a tech giant in a major class action alleging disparate impact based on gender.  His involvement includes addressing novel privilege issues, strategizing eDiscovery solutions, and positioning the client for opposition to class certification.  Besides litigation experience, Mike also counsels clients regarding OFCCP investigations, wage and hour compliance, and cross border human resources issues. He is also a member of the firm's Whistleblower Task Force and Blockchain Working Group.  In 2017, Mike was awarded Orrick's Community Responsibility Award for his involvement with several local service projects.

Mike graduated with honors from The Ohio State University College of Law, where he was also awarded the Public Service Fellow distinction, received several CALI Excellence for the Future Awards, and competed as a member of Ohio State's National Moot Court Team.  He received his undergraduate degree from Westminster College, magna cum laude, where he now serves on the College's Alumni Council.

Posts by: Michael Disotell

The Luck of the Draw: H-1B Lottery Set to Open March 9-25

Earlier this month, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services (“USCIS”) officially announced that the H-1B electronic registration period for FY2022 will be open from March 9 through March 25, 2021. During this period, prospective petitioners and representatives will be able to submit their registrations for potential H-1B candidates. READ MORE

How Much is Too Much? Whistleblower Bar Challenges the SEC’s Recent Whistleblower Program Amendments

On January 13, 2021, prominent whistleblower attorney and a principal architect of the Dodd-Frank Act whistleblower program, Jordan A. Thomas, filed a complaint against the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (“SEC” or “Commission”) seeking a declaratory judgment that certain provisions of the SEC’s recent whistleblower program amendments are invalid and cannot be enforced.  Specifically, the complaint challenges the SEC’s “clarification” of its authority to limit the size and number of certain whistleblower awards.

Under Dodd-Frank, the Commission pays a monetary award to a whistleblower that provides information to the SEC that leads to an enforcement action in an amount equal to but not less than 10% and not more than 30% of the monetary sanctions imposed by the SEC. Under Rule 21-F6, the agency calculates whistleblower awards in that 10-30% range by assigning an award percentage based on an array of positive and negative factors. The SEC then issues an award by multiplying the award percentage by the total monetary sanctions that the SEC collected.

Under the whistleblower program, awards in a single enforcement action as high as $114 million have been paid.  Thomas states that his clients have received some of the largest whistleblower awards in history, with three of his clients’ cases involving monetary sanctions in excess of $100 million.

The SEC voiced concerns in 2018 that excessively large awards could deplete the Investor Protection Fund. As a result, the SEC originally proposed a revised Rule 21F-6 in 2018 that would have expressly provided the Commission with the ability to make downward adjustments in connection with large awards where the monetary sanctions equaled or exceeded $100 million as long as the award payout did not fall below $30 million. However, the SEC ultimately scrapped the proposed rule and instead clarified in the new rules that it has always had the authority and discretion to consider the total dollar payout when applying the award criteria and adjust downward for large awards as reasonably necessary.

In addition, under the prior Rule 21F-3, the SEC would pay awards based on amounts collected in “related actions” and defined “related action” as a “judicial or administrative action that is brought by [specified agencies or self-regulatory organizations], and . . . based on the same original information that the whistleblower voluntarily provided to the Commission.” The SEC’s recent amendments revised Rule 21F-3 to award information provided in a “related action” “only if the Commission finds . . . that its whistleblower program has the more direct or relevant connection to the action.” Further, the Final Rule 21F-3 prevents whistleblowers from receiving an award if they have already been granted an award by another agency or if they have been denied an award by another agency’s whistleblower program.

According to Mr. Thomas’s complaint, the previous rules encouraged whistleblowers to come forward by guaranteeing that those individuals who acted properly would be awarded accordingly and would not have their awards unfairly and arbitrarily diminished.  In his complaint, he argues that this “clarification” to Rule 21F-6 is unlawful under the Administrative Procedure Act (“APA”) for at least five reasons: (1) the Final Rule was not a “logical outgrowth” of the proposed rule; (2) the SEC enacted the rule without acknowledging that it was changing its position; (3) the SEC failed to weigh the costs and benefits of the Final Rule; (4) the SEC adopted the rule without providing a reasoned explanation and despite the harms it will cause the whistleblower program; and (5) the SEC had no statutory authority to enact the rule. Furthermore, the complaint alleges the amendments to Rule 21F-3 are unlawful under the APA because (1) the SEC had no statutory authority to enact the changes and (2) the SEC adopted the rule without providing a reasoned explanation and despite the harms it will cause the whistleblower program.

As the complaint asserts, “[T]he potential for large monetary awards is the primary motivation for individuals to blow the whistle to law enforcement and regulatory authorities” and the challenged rule amendments “turn[] the Commission into a kind of casino that aggressively courts high-rollers with the promise of large jackpots but reserves the right to lower their winnings if those winnings get ‘too large.’” Further, the complaint surmises that would-be whistleblowers may weigh the costs and benefits of the revised whistleblower program and choose not to report possible securities violations to the SEC if they are worried their awards may be adjusted downwards or denied outright under the related action rules, ultimately reducing the number of individuals who report.

Certainly for the whistleblower bar, significant contingent legal fees are at stake.  The complaint notes that Thomas currently has nine whistleblower clients awaiting a final determination of entitlement to an award from the SEC, and that given the monetary sanctions collected, his clients collectively are eligible for awards of more than $300 million.  On each of these potential awards, Thomas’ firm will receive a contingency fee, and Plaintiff Thomas will receive incentive compensation for recovering the award on behalf of his client.

This is the first action attacking the Final Rule and no doubt will be met with a vigorous defense by the SEC.  We will monitor the progress of this action and questions of standing (i.e., whether lawyers that represent whistleblowers have standing to challenge this Final Rule) and whether the Final Rule passes muster under the APA.

Regulators Offer Insights Into SEC, CFTC, and OSHA Whistleblower Program’s Trends and Priorities

On July 13, 2020, three prominent whistleblower law regulators spoke at PLI’s Corporate Whistleblowing in the Coronavirus Era 2020, which was co-chaired by Orrick partners Mike Delikat and Renee Phillips. With the standard disclaimer that their comments and opinions were their own and not the official comments of their respective agencies, each spoke about their agencies’ whistleblower program’s current progress, challenges, and priorities. READ MORE

SEC Awards Largest Bounty Ever and More Expected to Come Out of the COVID-19 Pandemic

As we reported last month, the Securities & Exchange Commission (SEC) has continued to award numerous multi-million-dollar bounties under its Dodd-Frank whistleblower program notwithstanding the current COVID-19 crisis. READ MORE

Six Degrees of Separation: Temperature Testing as Employees Return to Work

As states begin to reopen and employees return to the workplace, employers are faced with trying to protect workers and prevent the spread of COVID-19 in the workplace. Many employers are looking to temperature testing as a potential safeguard. Like many emerging safety measures, though, there are several considerations to weigh before implementing temperature testing: READ MORE

SEC Whistleblower Program Going Strong During Coronavirus

Notwithstanding the current COVID-19 crisis, the Securities & Exchange Commission has continued to award numerous multi-million-dollar bounties under its Dodd-Frank whistleblower program.

Since January 21, 2020, when the CDC confirmed the first case of COVID-19 in the United States, the SEC has issued 12 whistleblower awards totaling approximately $64 million. Some of the highlights of these awards include: READ MORE

In Letter to Senators, DOL Clarifies Scope of the CARES Act’s Pandemic Unemployment Assistance Program

On April 17, 2020, the Department of Labor’s Deputy Assistant Secretary Joe Wheeler responded by letter to Senator Ron Wyden and other Democratic lawmakers who had raised concerns about the Coronavirus Aid, Relief, and Economic Security Act’s (CARES Act) Pandemic Unemployment Assistance (PUA) program. Notably, the letter clarifies several eligibility criteria, including that self-employed gig economy workers and workers who cannot work because they have coronavirus symptoms and are seeking a diagnosis may receive federal unemployment assistance under the PUA program. READ MORE

Preparing Coronavirus Workplace Safety Responses in APAC Countries

As the coronavirus, now officially named the “COVID-19 virus,” continues to spread across the world, employers are also looking to ensure a safe working environment for their employees. In addition to our previous perspectives for U.S. employers and EU employers, this updated overview provides employers in the rest of the Asia-Pacific (“APAC”) region with practical advice to develop their COVID-19 virus response strategy. Specifically, this overview covers the countries of: The People’s Republic of China, Hong Kong, Japan, Malaysia, Singapore, South Korea, Taiwan, Thailand, and Vietnam. READ MORE

Market-by-Market Overview: Protecting Your Offices & Other Worksites From COVID-19

Please note: Government guidance and regulation is changing rapidly, and so it is important for employers to always check on the applicable government site and with the Orrick team on the latest information. Employers may refer to information on Orrick’s COVID-19 Resource Center that provides country-specific links. READ MORE

What to do When Working From Home Won’t Work?

If you’re like many this week you, your partner or roommates and your children of all ages may be working from home. Schools of all levels are closed and maybe have instituted distance learning. Day care centers are closed too. So are libraries, coffee shops, restaurants and other places remote workers go to think and work. Successful working is about more than just having good WiFi. So, what are the options if remote working is not working for your employees or they simply cannot do their job from home? READ MORE