FDIC

Federal Banking Agencies Exempt Premium Finance Lending from BSA/AML Customer Identification Program Requirements

 

On October 9, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC), Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (Federal Reserve), Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC), and National Credit Union Administration (NCUA), with approval from the Treasury Department’s Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN), issued a revised order exempting premium finance loans (loans made to facilitate a borrower’s purchase of property and casualty insurance policies) from the customer identification program requirements applicable to a lender’s Bank Secrecy Act/Anti-Money Laundering (BSA/AML) compliance program. Order.

Banking Regulatory Agencies Finalize Rules on Real Estate Appraisals and Regulatory Treatment of Emergency Capital Facilities

 

On September 29, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC), the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (Federal Reserve) and the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC), together with the OCC and the Federal Reserve (the “Agencies”), published final rules temporarily deferring real estate appraisal requirements for financial institutions and mitigating the regulatory capital and liquidity effects for banks that participate in certain COVID-related Federal Reserve liquidity facilities. The final rules are identical or substantially similar to interim final rules currently in effect that were issued earlier this year. The final rule on real estate appraisals temporarily allows financial institutions to defer completion of appraisals and evaluations on certain residential and commercial real estate transactions for up to 120 days after closing. The final rule on the Federal Reserve liquidity facilities provides that banking organizations that participate in the Federal Reserve’s Money Market Mutual Fund Liquidity Facility and Paycheck Protection Program Liquidity Facility are permitted to exclude exposures acquired through their participation in such programs when determining their compliance with the Agencies’ regulatory capital rule and/or liquidity coverage ratio rule. OCC ReleaseFederal Reserve ReleaseFDIC Release

Regulatory Agencies Finalize Changes to Covered Fund Provisions of the Volcker Rule

 

On July 31, the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC), the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System (FRB), the U.S. CFTC, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC), and the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) published a final rule amending the regulations that implement Section 13 of the Bank Holding Company Act (the “BHC Act”), commonly known as the Volcker Rule. The final rule, which goes into effect on October 1, is intended to improve and streamline the covered fund provisions of Section 13 of the BHC Act. The final rule aims to accomplish this by, among other things, permitting the following activities: qualifying foreign excluded funds; revising the exclusions from the definition of “covered fund” for foreign public funds, loan securitizations, public welfare investments, and small business investment companies; creating new exclusions from the definition of covered fund for credit funds, qualifying venture capital funds, family wealth management vehicles, and customer facilitation vehicles; modifying the definition of “ownership interest”; and providing that certain investments made in parallel with a covered fund, as well as certain restricted profit interests held by an employee or director, need not be included in a banking entity’s calculation of its ownership interest in the covered fund. OCC Bulletin. Federal Register Final Rule.

Agencies Publish Rule Simplifying Capital Calculations for Community Banks

 

On October 29, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) and the Federal Reserve Board (FRB) adopted a final rule that simplifies capital requirements for community banks. The final rule allows community banks with less than $10 billion in total consolidated assets, a leverage ratio of greater than nine percent (9%) and limited amounts of off-balance-sheet exposures and trading assets to adopt a simple leverage ratio to measure their compliance with the capital requirements. The simplified leverage ratio framework removes requirements for calculating and reporting risk-based capital ratios for qualifying community banks that opt into the framework. FDIC Release. Federal Reserve Release.

FDIC Finalizes Rules to Simplify Capital Calculation for Qualifying Community Banking Organizations

 

On September 17, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) finalized a rule that introduces an optional community bank leverage ratio (CBLR) framework for measuring capital adequacy of qualifying community banking organizations. In order to qualify for the CBLR framework, a community banking organization must have a tier 1 leverage ratio of greater than 9 percent, less than $10 billion in total consolidated assets, and limited amounts of off-balance-sheet exposures and trading assets and liabilities. A qualifying community banking organization that opts into the CBLR framework and meets all requirements will be considered to have met the well-capitalized ratio requirements under the Prompt Corrective Action regulations and will not be required to report or calculate risk-based capital. Release. Final Rule.

FDIC Annual Publication Examines Potential Credit and Market Risks

 

The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) published its annual review of the primary risk factors facing the banking system, focusing on the categories of credit risk and market risk. The key credit risk identified by the FDIC is increased competition among lenders as loan growth has slowed, posing risk management challenges given market demand for higher-yielding leveraged loan and corporate bond products, resulting in looser underwriting standards. The main market risk recognized in the report is the current interest rate environment. Release. Report.

Agencies Complete Resolution Plan Evaluations and Extend Deadline for Certain Firms

 

The Federal Reserve Board and the FDIC completed their evaluation of 82 foreign banks’ 2018 resolution plans, which describe a company’s strategy for rapid and orderly resolution in the event of bankruptcy. In light of proposed resolution plan rule changes, the agencies also extended the deadline to file their next resolutions plans to 2021 for these 82 foreign banks and 15 additional domestic banks. Release. Joint Release.

Agencies Publish Rule Excluding Community Banks from Volcker Rule

 

On July 9, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC), the Federal Reserve Board, the Commodity Futures Trading Commission (CFTC), the Office of the Comptroller of the Currency (OCC) and the Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) adopted a final rule that excludes community banks from the Volcker Rule, which restricts banking entities from engaging in proprietary trading and from owning, sponsoring or having certain relationships with hedge funds or private equity funds. Under the final rule that was adopted, community banks with $10 billion or less in total consolidated assets, and which have total trading assets and liabilities that are 5% or less than such community bank’s total consolidated assets, will be excluded from the Volcker Rule.

 

FDIC to Centralize Key Aspects of Its Large, Complex Financial Institution Activities

 

On July 8, the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) announced its intentions to centralize the supervision and resolution activities for the largest banks and complex financial institutions in a new division to be named the Division of Complex Institution Supervision and Resolution (CISR). The new division will be responsible for the Agency’s supervision and monitoring of banks with assets greater than $100 billion for which the FDIC is not the primary federal regulator. On the resolution side, the new division will be responsible for planning for and executing the FDIC’s resolution mandates for these institutions, as well as for other financial companies if called upon to protect U.S. financial stability. Release.

OCC, Federal Reserve and FDIC Propose Revised Capital and Liquidity Framework for Foreign Banking Organizations

 

On May 24, the OCC, Federal Reserve and Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation (FDIC) published a notice of proposed rulemaking that would establish a revised framework for determining capital and liquidity requirements for large foreign banking organizations. Comments on the proposal must be submitted by June 21. Notice of Proposed Rulemaking.