Louisa Kallhoff

Managing Associate

Düsseldorf


Read full biography at www.orrick.com
Louisa Kallhoff is an associate in the Düsseldorf office and a member of the practice group Employment Law.

Louisa advises national and international companies on all issues of individual and collective employment law.

The main focus of her practice comprises employment aspects of transactions and restructurings, as well as employment and labor law issues such as personnel leasing, co-determination of employees and service agreements of managing directors and board members. She also advises national and international companies on day-to-day employment law matters.

Louisa Kallhoff joined Orrick in 2016.

Posts by: Louisa Kallhoff

#MeToo in Germany – Internal Investigation in Sexual Assault Cases

Due to increased awareness and reporting triggered by the international #metoo discussion, besides taking preventive measures, it is crucial for companies with employees in Germany to know what internal actions to take in the event an employee reports an incident of sexual harassment at the workplace. READ MORE

EU Plans on Whistleblower Protection

According to a survey by a national German newspaper, a large proportion of German whistleblowers are facing labor law and even health problems in connection with whistleblowing. 13 out of 20 whistleblowers subsequently lost their jobs. READ MORE

Works Council Elections 2018 in Germany – Are You Ready?

In Germany, regular works council elections are held every four years. The next election period is quickly approaching, starting on March 1, 2018.

Companies with business in Germany should prepare for the election process and employee initiatives to elect a works council. Our bilingual guide, based on years of experience, provides practical tips and legal considerations, navigates you through the election process and helps you avoid pitfalls that can be costly.

To access the full guide, please click here. If you have any questions, feel free to reach out to André Zimmermann, Head of our German Employment Law Practice, or Mike Delikat, Chair of our Global Employment Law Practice.

Germany: Employee Monitoring by Keylogger Permitted Only in Exceptional Cases

According to a recent decision of the German Federal Labor Court (Bundesarbeitsgericht – BAG), the use of a keylogger software, which records all keyboard entries on a workplace computer for covert monitoring and control of the employee, is prohibited if there is no suspicion of a criminal offense or severe breach of duty.

Legal Background

Although severely exceeding the limits of permissible private use of the workplace computer and Internet may in principle constitute such a grave infringement of the obligations under the employment relationship that a dismissal with immediate effect may be justified, it must be kept in mind that the employer bears the burden of proof for the employee’s misconduct in case of a claim for unfair dismissal.

If evidence is achieved in breach of the Federal Data Protection Act (Bundesdatenschutzgesetz – BDSG), this generally indicates that its utilization in legal proceedings may infringe the employee’s right on informational self-determination and, therefore, is not admissible evidence. READ MORE

Germany’s Financial Regulator Implements New Electronic System Guaranteeing Whistleblowers Absolute Anonymity and Non-traceability

As we reported last summer, Germany’s Financial Supervisory Authority (BaFin) set up a centralized platform for receiving whistleblower complaints of alleged violations of supervisory provisions within the financial sector.

Beginning this year, the BaFin implemented a new electronic system, allowing whistleblowers to submit their reports. The system guarantees the informants absolute anonymity, while on the other hand enabling the BaFin to make contact regarding possible inquiries. Thereby, although taking place on anonymous basis, the newly installed communication channel is expected to give BaFin the opportunity to verify the truth value of the submitted information by posing further questions, e.g. regarding the background of the complaint. READ MORE

Germany: Legislative Change Requires Amendments to Standard Employment Contracts

A legislative change that entered into force on October 1, 2016, affects multinationals with employees working in Germany. In order to comply with these recent changes, companies doing business in Germany should now double-check and, where necessary, adjust their standard employment contracts.

READ MORE

Using Temp Agencies in Germany: New Restrictions for Companies

On June 1, 2016, the draft law regarding the reform of the German Act on the Supply of Temporary Employees (Arbeitnehmerüberlassungsgesetz – AÜG) has been adopted by the Federal Cabinet. The German Bundestag will address the draft law after the summer break. However, material changes to the draft are not expected to be made during the parliamentary process. If the time schedule will be observed, the reform will come into force as planned on January 1, 2017.

The new law will bring material changes for both, employment agencies and their customers, the host businesses.

READ MORE

“Temporary Employees” in Germany Need to be Temporary Under New Draft Law

Draft legislation regarding the reform of the German Act on the Supply of Temporary Employees (Arbeitnehmerüberlassungsgesetz – AÜG) has been introduced by Germany’s Federal Minister of Labor. Although further amendments to this draft are likely and a final version will not come into force before January 1, 2017, it is important to know what this means for temporary employment agencies and their customers, the host businesses.

READ MORE