international employment law developments

2019 UK Gender Pay Gap Reporting – What to Expect

On 4 April 2019, employers with 250 or more employees will, once again, have to publish and report specific figures about their gender pay gap. And, following a year packed full of political statements and unprecedented movement towards gender equality, there will undoubtedly be pressure on employers to demonstrate progress in closing the gap.  READ MORE

“Yellow vest bonus:” how does it work?

Since mid-November 2018, France has been shaken by the “yellow vests” mass demonstrations. Originated on social media and grounded in its opposition to the TICPE (fuel tax) increase, the leaderless movement expresses more broadly, according to many analysts, a reaction to the dwindling purchase power of the middle class and a strong stance against the French establishment.

The political impact of the movement was quickly felt, as President Macron announced, in a televised address aired on 10 December 2018, a series reform aiming at meeting the yellow vests demands, including notably an increased minimum wage, tax and social exemptions for overtime hours as well as a tax and social contributions-free end of the year bonus.

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Works Council Elections 2018 in Germany – Are You Ready?

In Germany, regular works council elections are held every four years. The next election period is quickly approaching, starting on March 1, 2018.

Companies with business in Germany should prepare for the election process and employee initiatives to elect a works council. Our bilingual guide, based on years of experience, provides practical tips and legal considerations, navigates you through the election process and helps you avoid pitfalls that can be costly.

To access the full guide, please click here. If you have any questions, feel free to reach out to André Zimmermann, Head of our German Employment Law Practice, or Mike Delikat, Chair of our Global Employment Law Practice.

Vive la France! French Parent Company Potentially Liable on Alleged ADEA Claim on a Single-Employer Theory

Gavel on top of book with Age Discrimination chapter French Parent Company Potentially Liable on Alleged ADEA Claim on a Single-Employer Theory

With some exceptions, the ADEA applies to the U.S.-incorporated subsidiaries of foreign corporations. It remains unsettled whether employees can sue foreign parent companies of U.S. subsidiaries for age discrimination under the ADEA. Recently, in Downey v. Adloox Inc., Case No. 16-CV-1689 (JMF) (S.D.N.Y. Feb. 28, 2017), the U.S. District Court, Southern District of New York, found that the plaintiff plausibly alleged age discrimination under the ADEA against both his United States employer and its French parent company on a “single-employer” theory.

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Can You Hear The Whistle Blowing?: OECD Releases Report On Global Whistleblower Protections

The Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (“OECD”), an international organization whose goal is to promote policies that will improve the economic and social well-being of people across the world, recently published a report entitled “Committing to Effective Whistleblower Protection” (the “Report”).  A booklet containing the highlights of the report is available here.  In the Report, the OECD reviews whistleblower laws and practices within its 34 member countries, making it a useful resource for multinational companies doing business around the world.

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Employers in Germany May Now be Able to Check Browsing History of Work Computers

In certain circumstances an employer is entitled to analyse the browsing history of the work computer used by the employee without a need for the employee’s consent. This was made clear in a recent ruling of the Regional Labour Court (Landesarbeitsgericht – LAG) of Berlin-Brandenburg (judgment of January, 14 2016 – 5 Sa 657/15).

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